Read Is It Okay to Call God "Mother"?: Considering the Feminine Face of God by PaulSmith Online

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"This book is a "tour de force." It is simply magnificent" witty, scholarly, profoundly persuasive, blunt, prophetic, and convicting this slow-to-believe disciple all over the place."" Brennan Manning, Author of "The Ragamuffin Gospel""I'm not sure what to make of it all, but Paul Smith gives the best arguments I have ever come across for calling God Mother. For anyone str"This book is a "tour de force." It is simply magnificent" witty, scholarly, profoundly persuasive, blunt, prophetic, and convicting this slow-to-believe disciple all over the place."" Brennan Manning, Author of "The Ragamuffin Gospel""I'm not sure what to make of it all, but Paul Smith gives the best arguments I have ever come across for calling God Mother. For anyone struggling with how far we should go in using inclusive language, this is "must" reading." Tony Campolo, Eastern College"With tender power and wit, Paul Smith challenges the church to biblical fidelity and justice in its worship language. How encouraging it is to hear an evangelical male voice affirm the necessity of feminine images of God This outstanding book so clearly and convincingly demonstrates the biblical imperative for inclusive God-language that the Christian community can no longer ignore it."" Jann Aldredge-Clanton, Ph.D., Chaplain, Baylor University Medical Center, Author of "God and Gender" and "God: A Word for Girls and Boys"...

Title : Is It Okay to Call God "Mother"?: Considering the Feminine Face of God
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781565630130
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 288 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Is It Okay to Call God "Mother"?: Considering the Feminine Face of God Reviews

  • Johannes C
    2018-11-20 15:45

    I likely first encountered 'feminine' imagery for God mentioned only in passing by Marcus Borg, and followed up on it by reading briefly into verses in both the Hebrew Bible and the Christian testament that exhibited that sort of poetic flexibility. It remained something of theological interest to me, but only transformed my own practiced spiritual life when I encountered it for the first time in liturgy. An Anglican divinity student at my school, who I first met at an OPIRG meeting, used to deliver the most prophetic homilies at my school's chapel. One of her homilies was the first time I encountered God referred to as Mother in a very personal way that went beyond a mere theological concept. I used to be the only person outside the divinity school to attend those chapel services, and they were a real hidden gem. The attendance was telling though of the current state of mainline Protestantism and the value secular colleges have for intellectual and thoughtful religious literacy; the divinity school ended up closing a year after I graduated. This is why I found this book so interesting, because it was written by a Baptist, and thinks of its audience as Evangelicals, Charismatics, and Pentecostals (the faith family I grew up around and still practice within each Sunday, as evidenced by every other sermon I hear on Sunday containing a Spurgeon quote. Also Pentecostalism, which I spent most of my childhood immersed in, I believe is the fastest growing among Christian 'denominations'.)Reading this book was mostly an accident, I just found it at a very inexpensive price online, and loaded it onto my cart to reach a cheaper shipping bracket. A book written by a straight White, Baptist man would not be the first source I would have turned to for learning about this subject. I didn't expect to end up reading the entire book. However, my family ended up attending Church of the Holy Trinity on Christmas Eve (an Anglican community) because we happened to be near Nathan Phillips Square that day. My mother was really enjoying the whole service (music, sermon, sanctuary, hot cider), but near the end of the service, without warning something emerged in the liturgy that shocked her and visibly upset her: "O God, our Mother and Father in heaven." Afterwards, I struggled to explain my own perspective, and my thoughts were found wanting when discussing with my mom. Soon after, I opened up this book and tried to find a better way to articulate the reasons I personally had for using more expansive language when trying to talk about and to God.I found the first few chapters of the book most rewarding. There's a lot of biblical quoting throughout which seems quite important to the evangelical audience Smith has in mind. I thought the reasoning in this first half very practical, accessible, and exhibited a type of clarity that might not have been there for more academically oriented books on this matter. I also enjoyed the examples cited of feminine imagery used throughout Christian history, as well as Smith's confessions of his own difficulties with working through the initial awkwardness of changing the theological language he used, especially in personal times of prayer and reflection.I did however, find the book to be somewhat repetitive, and at times felt like a compilation of fragments from different sermons or articles, with the same points made a number of times throughout, just situated in different lines of reasoning. Consequently I personally felt the book was longer than it needed to be (at least with respect to what I was looking for). But I think it'll be quite useful to have for reference in the future, especially since, more often, I do find myself in the company of people who practice more conservative forms of Christianity.

  • Leandra
    2018-12-14 15:46

    Is it okay to call God "Mother?The answer is YES!I am not kidding when I say that this life has changed my (Christian) life forever.Looking back I realize that my whole life, I was seeking God the Mother, the Awesome She without even knowing. This book has truly opened my eyes about the truths of God's feminine side.Smith perfectly elaborates on what God was inviting us to as S/He invited us to call Her/Him "Father" and points out many scriptural verses that point to God's maternal nurturing side. I don't agree 100% with his attitude towards making the church more "gender-neutral" when hosting church services, and only having a 5-5 scale of male-female pronouns. I believe it is still vastly important to acknowledge God as a very personal being and we should never shy away from calling God He (as long as we don't overbalance that over She) and that we should strive for a more "gender-balanced" service (I would suggest 25-25).Nevertheless, this book has really shaped the way that I see God's image and has really opened the floodgates of being able to relate to God better as a woman. Smith perfectly sums it up by saying that "Everybody needs a mom and dad on Earth - and one in heaven too."

  • Lauren
    2018-11-19 16:45

    Smith's book is an excellent resource addressing the male view towards the feminine image of God. Some things he said were a little too Southern Baptist for me, which is why I gave it 4 instead of 5 stars. The book is still full of wisdom and his points are well stated, especially when thinking of the volatile atmosphere in the SBC during which this book was published. You can tell a little that the book was written in the 90s, though the cartoons and comics add to the book's charm. Worth a read! Especially if you are uncomfortable with feminine imagery, his humility draws the reader in.

  • Libby O'Neill
    2018-11-22 18:41

    I'd give it 3.5 stars. Very good explanation of why God contains both masculine and feminine and how our language has distorted that for...a really long time. It was a little boring at times, jumpy at times, but overall very good. I had to remind myself many times that it was written over 20 years ago, and it's still quite progressive, but some of the things the author writes are dated. What can you do. I'd recommend this book to those wondering if it's okay, and why it's more than okay--it's important--to call God "mother."