Read Notes on Leaving by Laisha Rosnau Online

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Notes on Leaving is a debut poetry collection that is every bit as captivating, emotive and razor-sharp as Laisha Rosnau's bestselling first novel The Sudden Weight of Snow. Rosnau's poignant poems address life in a startlingly direct and honest voice, employing a robust combination of jaw-dropping forthrightness and delicately crafted verse.The language of Notes on LeavinNotes on Leaving is a debut poetry collection that is every bit as captivating, emotive and razor-sharp as Laisha Rosnau's bestselling first novel The Sudden Weight of Snow. Rosnau's poignant poems address life in a startlingly direct and honest voice, employing a robust combination of jaw-dropping forthrightness and delicately crafted verse.The language of Notes on Leaving is brusque, bright and instinctively fluid: lines and words flow and merge as naturally as they collide head-on. In the world-weary persona of someone who has always found herself on the run ("my mind was farther away than farm and field. . . "), and "prone to breakdowns/ of all kinds," Rosnau energetically conveys sexually charged and angst-ridden desires to urgently abandon a small-town upbringing, among various other lives and identities. She convincingly presents these primal urges as strikingly and sensuously familiar to us all, "tracing a route down your torso, thrumming south,/ the highway swelling with each town, until/ you round the last curve, a crescendo, and cross/ the river to a place where the city meets itself." Cutting through time zones that encompass the rural and urban, the remembered and the forgotten, Rosnau reminds us to "Pay attention to your surroundings," to "watch for potential road-kill," and to "compare scars" along the way....

Title : Notes on Leaving
Author :
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ISBN : 9780889712003
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 85 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Notes on Leaving Reviews

  • Bonnie
    2019-03-18 20:05

    Winner of the 2005 Acorn Plantos People’s Poetry Prize (The award recognizes poetry written with the common reader in mind.)I know what I wanted. Air thrust in and out of lungs like blows, that pure physicality, shortness of breath, chests rising, pupils engorged to take in the peaks around us. Fine licks of sweat, taste of salt on mouths, we would always lead ourselves back to where we started.After reading this book, I have decided that I am going to read more poetry. In this collection, Laisha Rosnau explores a wide range of themes around leaving and arriving; transit and transitions. The lengthiest poem (8 segments) “Notes on Arrival/Notes on Leaving”, is about leaving behind a man.: 1. it is a transition; over a boundary marked only by a fold in a map…6. leave behind/bands of humming light in the sky so newly dark it is electric with night./when you do, when you leave without him, you will feel the fold in the map as surely as the jolt of tires too fast against a sudden rise in the road./and while 7. his smell/wanes from your skin you find solace in the fact that you have the truck, your movement refracted in sun off metal, a silvered drop sliding down the charted page, memory of his tongue tracing a route down your torso, thrumming south, the highway swelling with each town, until you round the last curve, a crescendo, cross the river’s mouth to a place where the city meets itself on each wave and ripple the water brings in, and 8. forget everything else.Rosnau’s poetry is direct; yet it flows with a deep intensity. There often seems to be a current of sexual energy running between the lines in Laisha's poetry, no matter what the subject. In “Hestia”: When your sisters left, taken by marriage, your father hired hands, you helped Mother in the kitchen./It would be years before the first half-ton truck drove by your farm but you knew then what you wanted: the control of something so large: to hold the gears in your hand and shift.Within the themes are memories of childhood, teenage growing pains, love relationships and sexuality. One of my favourite poems is called “How Babies are Made”. It begins with a young girl and her mother reading a book that explains intercourse, very explicitly. The girl asks, “Do grown-ups really do this?” and “How does it feel?” “Very good. If you’re married.”Your friend’s cat gives birth in a boxunder the table on the patio. You tell Cindy about the way babies are made, the words bigbetween you. ...PenisRegina...until you both wonder who Muffin married.You and Cindy are too smallto close the latch on the patio gate. You watch and scream while King,the German shepherd, eatsthe baby kittens, the soundof small bones between his teethlouder than any word you’ve read.Another favourite is “Request” which begins: As I danced, a man said, I want to see you naked. The poem ends: he never did see me naked – and you might not either. But, let me tell you this: we live in a world saturated with symbolism. Sometimes, it is best to be direct. Laisha explores landscapes across Canada and overseas; from small towns to cities, spanning decades in time. In “One Hundred Dead Kangaroos” she rides in a van with a couple of men in the front seat and is challenged to a game counting roadkill. They “cap the count at one hundred. I win every time, my eye sharp for different shades of death.” Later, on her own, she sees fewer kangaroos, but she counts the dead, regardless. I will remember the heat between our three bodies cramped in the front seat when one of them asked, “How many points for a dead man?” and I didn’t know how to calculate the answer. In the final poem, “Montreal 1977”, the first lines are a daughter asking her mother, “What is charismatic?” Her mother’s answer: “Our Prime Minister.” The poem ends with: …the mother explains, Charisma. Confidence, her daughter’s hand hot in hers. That’s what we need, what everyone wants, and the girl takes note. Notes on Leaving is a slim volume of just over 40 poems, but it is an electrifying debut. There was not one poem I didn’t like. I can’t wait to read Laisha Rosnau’s recently released new collection of poetry, Lousy Explorers.

  • Andrea
    2019-02-26 16:47

    Good poetry is a journey of discovery where one will find elements of inspiration. As an experimental writer I find nothing more satisfying than reading well written poems. There is a rhythm and a life-force to Laisha's work and I look forward to reading more. Here is a small fragment of a particularly interesting poem that I wanted to share: From "What Is Taken"(p.82) "what is lost? How much am I responsible for giving away? Yes, I followed him down trails, beside rivers, up slopes, strained each muscle that moved me. I followed, feet pounding a rhythm with his, a series of spent breaths that would eventually lead us back to the place where we started."Poetry well worth reading.

  • Craig
    2019-02-28 12:58

    A great "tough-girl" sort of poetics. I really enjoyed the voice. Some great metaphor in an otherwise 'plain language' sort of style. Conversational, narrative, yet quite a bit of depth to it.

  • nikki
    2019-03-23 16:38

    i think i liked "part iv; leaving" the best. on the whole, this is a really nice collection