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In ancient cultures, each village had a shaman or medicine man who would visit the invisible world to obtain vital information, guidance, and healing for members of the tribe. These edgewalkers have contemporary counterparts in today's organizations--those individuals who don't fit squarely into any one box; in their metaphorical travels they interpret trends from the markIn ancient cultures, each village had a shaman or medicine man who would visit the invisible world to obtain vital information, guidance, and healing for members of the tribe. These edgewalkers have contemporary counterparts in today's organizations--those individuals who don't fit squarely into any one box; in their metaphorical travels they interpret trends from the marketplace, translate messages across departments, and envision the future impact of today's decisions and actions. Edgewalking doesn't come without its own risks and challenges; these unconventional people often clash with more traditional, rule-bound colleagues, and they are often frustrated by organizational systems that emphasize quantitative results over creative impulses. And yet in today's fast-changing, diverse, and globalized business environment, organizations must recruit and support these people in order to stay competitive. Featuring colorful interviews and practical tools to gauge and manage your own edgewalking skills, Edgewalkers explores the opportunities that are created by defying formal boundaries and fostering creativity at every level of the organization.They're the first people to volunteer to head up a new business unit, lead a cross-company initiative, or take on an overseas assignment. They're the glass half-full folks, who are constantly thinking out of the box, forging alliances with colleagues in other departments, seeking out new solutions to old problems, and anticipating challenges on the horizon. And in today's increasingly diverse workplaces, they are often people who have pursued unusual educational and career paths, traveled widely, and speak more than one language. Judi Neal has a term for these people: Edgewalkers.Literally, an edgewalker is someone who walks between two worlds. In ancient cultures, each village had a shaman or medicine man who would visit the invisible world to obtain vital information, guidance, and healing for members of the tribe. Today's corporate edgewalkers serve a similar function, interpreting trends from the marketplace, translating messages across departments, and envisioning the future impact of today's decisions and actions. Edgewalking doesn't come without its own risks and challenges; these unconventional people often clash with more traditional, rule-bound colleagues, and they are often frustrated by organizational systems that emphasize quantitative results over creative impulses. And yet in today's fast-changing, globalized business environment, organizations must recruit and support these people in order to stay competitive. Featuring colorful interviews with edgewalkers from a variety of fields and practical tools to gauge and manage your own edgewalking skills, Edgewalkers explores the opportunities that are created by defying formal boundaries and fostering creativity at every level of the organization....

Title : Edgewalkers: People and Organizations That Take Risks, Build Bridges, and Break New Ground
Author :
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ISBN : 9780275989200
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 188 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Edgewalkers: People and Organizations That Take Risks, Build Bridges, and Break New Ground Reviews

  • Rhiannon Grant
    2019-04-15 01:57

    I was recommended this book after a talk I gave about multiple religious belonging, and although it isn't about that at all, there are some points of connection. The Edgewalkers of the title are considered mainly in the context of traditional businesses (organisations who make and sell things, mostly), and although spirituality, in forms varying from the slightly New-Agey to the full-on Woo, is a key theme, there's no sustained analysis of religion. Some of the observations about organisations will also apply to faith communities (the descriptions towards the end of the book of Doomsayers, Placeholders, and Flamekeepers, and their conflicts with Edgewalkers, rang very true in this respect), but other aspects are more problematic to the scholar of religion. The unexamined uses of 'vision quests' and some other quasi-Native American ideas are morally problematic, for example, and the conflation of all religions and spiritualities with each other and often with culture, too, means that this aspect of the book lacks a rigour which seems to be there in other places (for example, in sections about business theory). An interesting read - I'm enough of an Edgewalker to enjoy something like this which is well outside my usual field - but not revolutionary for me.