Read Like Water On Stone: The Story Of Amnesty International by Jonathan Power Online

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When British attorney Peter Beneson founded Amnesty International in 1961 to campaign for the release of political prisoners, his idea of bombarding offending governments with letters, postcards, and telegrams was sharply criticized as "one of the larger lunacies of our time." Forty years later, with more than one million members and supporters in over 160 countries and teWhen British attorney Peter Beneson founded Amnesty International in 1961 to campaign for the release of political prisoners, his idea of bombarding offending governments with letters, postcards, and telegrams was sharply criticized as "one of the larger lunacies of our time." Forty years later, with more than one million members and supporters in over 160 countries and territories, London-based Amnesty has impacted individual lives and played a significant role in shaping public policy, if not always practice, of governments around the globe. Amnesty's extraordinary strategies to reduce human rights abuses are critically examined in this objective look at the successes and failures of the organization over the last four decades. In Like Water on Stone, author Jonathan Power recognizes Amnesty's considerable achievements-the difficult struggles in Guatemala to help those facing death squads, discusses the case in the Central African Republic where Amnesty's masterful detective work exposed the massacre of defenseless children, and investigates attempts to bring former Chilean strongman Augustine Pinochet to justice. But Power does not shy away from raising the difficult questions about Amnesty's strategies. Do Amnesty's campaigns lead repressive governments to murder rather than jail political prisoners? Is the organization's research and reports always accurate? Was Amnesty right to label British methods of interrogation in Northern Ireland as "torture?" Was Amnesty right to lobby for better prison conditions for the notorious Baader-Meinhoff gang in Germany? Like Water on Stone also explores Amnesty's efforts in China, Morocco, Sri Lanka, and Colombia. A sobering review of Amnesty's work in the United States considers the hypocrisies of a nation that champions human rights abroad but tolerates police brutality, racial profiling, and capital punishment within its own borders. One of Amnesty's best known adopted political prisoners, Olusegun Obasanjo, now the democratically elected president of Nigeria and a personal friend of author Power, once described Amnesty International as operating "like water on stone." According to Jonathan Power, the world is indeed a better place because of the organization's slow yet steady strides in the fight for human rights....

Title : Like Water On Stone: The Story Of Amnesty International
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780713993196
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 477 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Like Water On Stone: The Story Of Amnesty International Reviews

  • Elli
    2018-11-10 17:48

    Like water on a stone: The story of Amnesty International by Jonathan PowerDisclaimer: I read this book in its Swedish translation.Personally I find the work of Amnesty to be very interesting and I have a personal interest in human rights, therefore I found this book very interesting, and I’m assuming you do to, since you’re thinking of reading this book. It really is an interesting read, even if you aren’t particularly interested in Amnesty, and just want a good book on human rights. My recommendation is to treat each chapter separately, you shouldn’t read this book all in one go, it isn’t necessary and really, the book is quite heavy so taking breaks from it could be good to keep feeling interested.There are two main issues I had with the book. The first one is that Jonathan Power (in my case the translator) hasn’t done much to make the more bureaucratic parts of the story of Amnesty interesting to read about, and at times the book reads as a file, and just paperwork. It is a though book to get through and by no means an easy read or a page turner. Some parts are also quite graphic in describing torture people have been through, so bare that in mind.My other issue is that Jonathan Power doesn’t explore the critique of Amnesty being too “leftist”. A lot of the time he brings up former high status members whom have earlier been involved in left-wing politics, but never seems to treat this as an issue. He does mention that there is critique of Amnesty being to left-wing, but never speaks his own opinion on it. I would have liked to hear more about that. I’m not sure if I would recommend the book. Really only if you have a serious interest on the subject, otherwise it’s just too heavy to get through. It’s also quite old, so if you are looking for something purely out of a human rights interest, you might want to look at something a little bit more up to date.

  • Jennifer
    2018-11-09 21:24

    As Gennevieve Sevrin wrote me when adhering, "Avoir des opinions est une chose. Savoir les transformer en engagement est beaucoup plus rare.""Having opinions is one thing. Knowing how to transform them into commitment is much more rare."

  • Jessie B.
    2018-12-09 21:38

    There is some interesting information in this book but it is very random in its organizations and seems to be more like a collection of anecdotes than an organized history of Amnesty International.

  • Weavre
    2018-11-20 16:31

    OST NON-FICTION ADULT STK 323 POW

  • Y.Z.
    2018-11-23 00:50

    The cover is by Picasso.