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The Age of Reconnaissance, as J. H. Parry has so aptly named it, was the period during which Europe discovered the rest of the world. It began with Henry the Navigator and the Portuguese voyages in the mid-fifteenth century and ended 250 years later when the "Reconnaissance" was all but complete. Dr. Parry examines the inducements—political, economic, religious—to overseasThe Age of Reconnaissance, as J. H. Parry has so aptly named it, was the period during which Europe discovered the rest of the world. It began with Henry the Navigator and the Portuguese voyages in the mid-fifteenth century and ended 250 years later when the "Reconnaissance" was all but complete. Dr. Parry examines the inducements—political, economic, religious—to overseas enterprises at the time, and analyzes the nature and problems of the various European settlements in the new lands....

Title : The Age of Reconnaissance: Discovery, Exploration, and Settlement, 1450-1650
Author :
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ISBN : 9780520042353
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 400 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Age of Reconnaissance: Discovery, Exploration, and Settlement, 1450-1650 Reviews

  • AC
    2019-03-01 13:51

    Deciding to reread this book now, two years later, was definitely the right choice. This book is fabulous. A masterful, brilliant, authoritative -- suffused with a poetry and spirit of man (humanitas) -- treatment of the principle saliant of the 16th-17th cen. European experience.(This review was written close to 2 years ago; I finished the book at that time but, since the topic was basically new to me, I missed a lot -- and so I've decided I need to reread this one....)This is, put simply, a magnificent book. Rich, detailed, insightful -- absolutely flawless in its scholarship, which is not at second-hand (as is, e.g., Jardine's) -- and humane. The chapter on the economic background -- and the decline of Italy and the Mediterranean -- it is brief, but remarkably insightful. The chapter on ships is technical -- all about sails, jibs, lateens, caravels, galleons, and all sorts of other stuff I understand nothing about. Growing more confident about this book with every passing page, nonetheless...After reading the opening two chapters, I can say that this seems to be a really masterful treatment... of a subject that I haven't read much about, admittedly. Written in 1963, the scholarship may well be out of date in places -- and the book was written before certain things became politically incorrect, which sometimes strikes the odd note. It is strange also to find Cortés and Spanish Counter-Reformation (Isabella and her Inquisition) described in terms of Renaissance ideas of the individual and of Machiavellian statecraft....

  • Lauren Albert
    2019-03-05 07:57

    A solid if prosaic look at the age of exploration. Very much a school text if a better one than would be produced today.

  • Ryan
    2019-03-04 09:11

    On the whole the book ably elucidates the various threads of European seafaring and "discovery." The chapter on sailing might as well have been written in Greek thanks to how little knowledge I have of maritime terminology. I was much more at home with the chapter discussing the origins of differing visions of international law promulgated by Vitoria, Las Casas, and Sepulveda. Wish I could have been at that debate between the latter two. It was probably a slobberknocker, bah gawd!It's an older book and suffers from impolitic references to savage peoples, heathens, etc. I enjoyed it anyway. Huzzah.

  • !Tæmbuŝu
    2019-02-23 12:18

    KOBOBOOKS

  • Grindy Stone
    2019-03-16 06:14

    Unexpected gem of popular history - I got it for a quarter from a Friends of the Library sale.