Read Selo & Inya: Lady of the Court by Ankhesen Mié Online

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“Lady of the Court” is the debut novelette in a new series by Ankhesen Mié. This book introduces us to Selo, a young warrior from an all-female society, who is assigned to escort her Princess Abeti to a neighboring kingdom. Abeti is to be given in a "blood marriage" after her mother wins a weary battle.Upon arrival in at the princess’s new palace, Selo is sent to train as“Lady of the Court” is the debut novelette in a new series by Ankhesen Mié. This book introduces us to Selo, a young warrior from an all-female society, who is assigned to escort her Princess Abeti to a neighboring kingdom. Abeti is to be given in a "blood marriage" after her mother wins a weary battle.Upon arrival in at the princess’s new palace, Selo is sent to train as the princess’s Chief Attendant under the tutelage of Inya, the court herbalist. Thus begins a friendship borne of unlikely circumstances, as Selo learns not only the troubling truth about mixed societies, but their royal houses as well....

Title : Selo & Inya: Lady of the Court
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : B00B39MWQW
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 117 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Selo & Inya: Lady of the Court Reviews

  • The FountainPenDiva, Old school geek chick and lover of teddy bears
    2019-03-14 02:55

    As an avid fantasy fan who loves her warrior heroines (especially when they're of color), I didn't think there would ever be another contender for my all-time favorite warrior heroines outside of Tarma (from Mercedes Lackey's Vows or Honor series) or Dirisha Zuri (of Steve Perry's Matador series). Thanks to author Ankhesen Mié, I can add Selo to the list.Selo comes from an all-female society warrior society (inspired by the the Dahomey Amazons). Assigned to escort Princess Abeti to a rival kingdom in order to secure peace between two nations, Selo finds a vastly different world where feminine power lies not in the sword, but in the wielding of beauty. Like the proverbial misfit, she finds it difficult to adjust to life in a mixed society where women's roles are far more circumscribed. In order to be her princess’s Chief Attendant, she is given over for training to Inya the court herbalist. Inya is that wise, matter-of-fact and no nonsense tutor that the bemused warrior woman needs in order to make sense of her new surroundings. They forge a deep friendship based on mutual respect and soon will begin a journey of adventure.Granted, this is a short novella but does it pack a serious wallop and it made me eager for the next installment. Mie is a brilliant writer who brings her worlds and her characters to vibrant life.

  • Xian Xian
    2019-03-04 22:59

    I often get bored of fantasy these days. It just doesn’t pull me in the same way everything else does. Magical realism, I like though, but then somebody on Facebook was like “Magical realism is just fantasy!” And I was like “WHAAT?!” I don’t believe them. I actually wrote this review, a different version, for Feisty Zine, so this is a cross post.Selo & Inya restored some faith in me. It takes place in a fictional world that seems to meld West African, East Asian, Polynesian, and South Asian cultures and religions. There are two societies, there’s one where there’s only females and there’s a mixed society which has males and females. The first novella, Lady of the Court, starts off the series with Selo, from the kingdom of Tiy, a woman warrior who ends up leaving her homeland after her sister gets into a blood marriage to end the war between the kingdoms. When she arrives in Oon Sati, where the marriage takes place, she meets an herbalist nomad named Inya who becomes her guide after some incidents cause her to leave Oon Sati. And the whole series consists of Selo and Inya traveling to the various kingdoms and getting into a few scuffles. You will soon find out that somebody out there is planning something the duo is unaware of and that someone wants to get rid of them before they find out.Selo and Inya are lively characters and just like any well written character, they are distinct and grow throughout the series. Since Selo is a warrior and an orphan, she’s very closed off and sort of cold. She’s serious and made of stone, but yet she’s motherly. Inya is loose and carefree which causes a bit of trouble along the way that Selo tends to clean up. Inya is the bright beacon, she’s the Oscar of The Odd Couple while Selo is sort of like Felix. These two ladies are polar opposites, yet the friendship works. The biggest character development happened for Selo in Queen of Dust, which was nominated for best short novel by The Swirl Awards.Since this is a series of novellas, they’re pretty short reads, and the prose is quick and engaging. The writing doesn’t leave the canvas blank, there’s vivid imagery that holds the story’s existence into place, meaning that it doesn’t feel like you’re reading about the journey of two nameless blobs. It’s also thick enough to map out a world, but there’s no large amounts of info dumping. There are tactics to build a world in genre fiction without writing a whole background story outline. Overall, Selo & Inya is a pretty solid ongoing series. It is a breathe of fresh air and hopefully it will leave a mark in the fantasy fiction world, especially in the small press and indie section.Lady of the Court: 5/5Hunter: 4.5/5Queen of Dust: 5/5Overall: Strong 5.Cross posted from Feisty Zine and Notes on the Shore