Read Caught: One Man's Maniacal Pursuit of a Sixty Pound Striped Bass and His Experiences with the Black Market Fishing Industry by JeffNichols Online

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FINAL EDITION !! "Caught is a nervy, quotable, important expose, full of lively anecdotes, marginal colorful characters." - Joan Baum, NPR Dan's Papers "This is an eye-opening account of the black market striped bass industry, and a vivid portrayal of one man's fishing addiction that contributed to it. With chapters like 'The Full Moon Beckons Like a Crack Pipe, ' the readFINAL EDITION !! "Caught is a nervy, quotable, important expose, full of lively anecdotes, marginal colorful characters." - Joan Baum, NPR Dan's Papers "This is an eye-opening account of the black market striped bass industry, and a vivid portrayal of one man's fishing addiction that contributed to it. With chapters like 'The Full Moon Beckons Like a Crack Pipe, ' the reader is drawn into the world of obsessive striped bass fishing and this angler's eventual descent into the underground market to support the ever-growing expenses of his fishing habit. But it's the Striped Bass as a species that suffer the most, as stocks are - once again - pushed into decline." --John Skinner, Noreast.com, author of "A Season on the Edge"...

Title : Caught: One Man's Maniacal Pursuit of a Sixty Pound Striped Bass and His Experiences with the Black Market Fishing Industry
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781492369202
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 136 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Caught: One Man's Maniacal Pursuit of a Sixty Pound Striped Bass and His Experiences with the Black Market Fishing Industry Reviews

  • Jimmy
    2018-08-21 22:14

    Jeff Nichols writes about his addiction to fishing for striped bass and the underground market that is helping to once again push the species into decline. If our national symbol was a fish rather than a bird, it would be a striped bass. Restaurants accept illegal fish rather than pay wholesale prices. That in turn hurts the commercial fishing industry. Criminals use submerged gillnets to catch tons of stripers that goes to unknown destinations. The bass are collecting PCBs as they travel up the Hudson River to spawn. Not healthy to eat more than a few servings a month. Once Nichols was showing off a big striper when a man walking by told him he should have tossed it back. Big bass are all females. They lay about 2 million eggs. Now Nichols realizes he was wrong. Maybe this book can convince a few other fishermen the same thing. Charter boats aren't making much money any more. People aren't going fishing like that as much. Now many people catch and release. Trophy fishing is just vanity. Maybe that can help by a form of shaming. But catch and release can be a problem as well. Releasing in warm water kills them. Weighing them and playing around with them can kill them. Cutting Coast Guard budgets has hurt. Regulation and enforcement is needed. When limits were set, boats could have hundreds of fish on deck waiting for the biggest and then throwing the rest over. Dead. This is called culling or "upgrading." Humans destroy the shoreline. Septic tanks overflow into the water. Pesticides and fertilizers enter the water. Algae blooms are created. Why be obsessed with a green lawn? If you are such a person, Gentle Reader, consider changing. Dandelions won't kill you. In fact, they are good for bees. The book might make a good gift for someone who could use a little nudge to improve their environmental consciousness.

  • Kevin Callahan
    2018-08-02 23:03

    Incredible story of what it is really like to chase the magical 50 lb bass. The humor had me reading from start to finish

  • David Ward
    2018-07-30 21:53

    Caught: One Man's Maniacal Pursuit of a Sixty Pound Striped Bass and His Experiences with the Black Market Fishing Industry by Jeff Nichols (CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform 2013) (799 +/-). This is a book about addiction, purely and simply. Our author gets it too; he shares this definition of addiction: “...a recurring compulsion by an individual to engage in some specific activity, despite harmful consequences, as deemed by the user themselves to their individual health, mental state, or social life.” Caught, frontispiece, citing Wikipedia. Our author loves to fish, but he lives to fish for striped bass (or stripers) off the waters of Montauk Island, New York. We learn that a forty-pound striped bass is the dividing line between a trophy (forty pounds) and just another nice fish (thirty-nine pounds fifteen ounces). But a forty pound striped bass is hardly the ultimate prize for the bass fisherman. If a fishing contest were scored in terms of Olympic medals, then a forty pound striped bass would win the bronze medal. If a fisherman is lucky and persistent, he may one day catch a fifty pounder; this would be akin to winning an Olympic silver medal. [An aside: our author discloses that despite exhaustive efforts he has yet to catch a fifty-pound striped bass.] A gold-medal winning striped bass weighs at least sixty pounds and is a rare creature indeed. The author shares with us the fact there have been two fish caught which each weighed at least seventy-six pounds. Now imagine that someone loves to fish so much that striped bass fishing is “...(insert definition of addiction from above).” Imagine fishing so much that you can't stop when you should. Imagine choosing to fish if it costs you your wife, your kids, your job, your car, and your house. This is addiction, and this is what happened to the author. I think. There are two possibilities: either Jeff Nichols wrote Caught in straightforward fashion and reported the tragic consequences of his fishing addiction, or else Jeff Nichols wrote the whole thing in tongue-in-cheek fashion in a sort of a Waiting for Godot style. Either way, I really liked this effort from Jeff Nichols. He is a fine storyteller. I also commend the editors and proofreaders for producing a tale that flows as effortlessly as the tide. My rating: 7.5/10, finished 1/22/15.

  • Sam
    2018-07-24 02:51

    At first blush this book could appear as Nichols laying his demons to rest given his addiction to catching the biggest bass he can and the lengths he went to do so. He gets involved in shady dealings, feeding the black market for bass and other fish as he tries to keep his boat and his business so he can keep hitting the waves in search for that one perfect trophy fish. In reality this is a candid and honest account of how he got sucked in to the world of trophy fishing and the journey he went on (and needed to go on) before he could realise the impacts of his actions and the actions of others. He tells his story with a great level of humour that keeps what is potentially a dry and in places depressing subject enjoyable and readable while still getting his message across. A message that doesn't try to place blame or point fingers, just one that tries to say 'look, these are my mistakes, this is what I've learned, this is what we all need to think about and do something about'. This is supported by an essay by his friend Zack Harvey that goes through the facts behind Jeff's experiences and the big picture that Jeff alludes to throughout his story. The only issue I had with this is the jumping back and fore that Nichols did when telling his story which confused the timeline a little but it did fit the style of the story as it felt as though he was there telling it as it came back to him rather than a formal story. I would note that I have grown up around hobby fishermen (including my dad) and know that many of the issues raised here are familiar and often discussed at length amongst them, with the only real agreement being that there are concerns and that something needs to be done. An excellent read that will touch everyone, whether you fish or not.

  • Martha Brideau
    2018-08-05 00:45

    VERY FUNNY,INFORMATIVE and ENLIGHTENING!! I must be honest, I do not fish. I do not eat fish. I do not even own a fish tank. I do have a few close friends that are avid fishermen. Although I do not understand their obsession, they do not understand my obsessions with shoes. To each their own. I thought this book sounded like it would help me learn about these die-hard fishermen and also some of the ecological impact that some of the poachers and others that don't always do things by the rules. I was very pleased.The author tells his story, warts and all, in a way that is very humorous. He helps you understand how people get into situations that are not always above board and how their seemingly minor infractions can cause major problems with the supply of fish. He also delves into the seamy side of the fishing industry and how seriously commercial fisherman and others take their proprietary rights. Ho one's life and boat can be threatened by saying the wrong thing to the wrong person. This author is brave enough to spill his secrets to help keep his beloved fishing industry going long into the future and as a result may no longer be able to safely do it where he loves. He shares his stories with such humor, I would even consider going fishing with him just to listen to his stories.

  • Gary Brecht
    2018-08-16 19:03

    The value of a good sense of humor while under stress can never be overestimated. Author Jeff Nichols proves this as he tackles the serious dilemma of how to keep all interested parties from clashing over the potential collapse of the striped bass population along the East Coast. Told from the perspective of a repentant black market sport fisherman, Jeff has his readers laughing out loud as he describes his passion to nail a sixty pound striped bass. Working his way up the Montauk wharf scene the author eventually becomes a charter boat captain and illegally sells a portion of his catch at the back doors of posh restaurants. A variety of thuggish boat captains, obsessive lawmen, and other dockside characters add more zest to this chowder served up by Jeff. The author in due course realizes that we need to respect striped bass rather than slaughter them indiscriminately. For those who are concerned about the preservation of species or the continuation of a viable sport fishing culture, this is an important book.

  • Kristal Cooper
    2018-07-27 23:58

    There are grey areas to all businesses and Nichols shines a light on those of the fishing industry in this quick read that should give anyone pause before going out on a charter or buying a fish special at a restaurant. The author admits to being a lawbreaker and culprit in the current decline of striped bass on the east coast. It's painful to read, but I was happy to hear his change of heart and call to action by the end. He's correct that the real problem here is human greed and the prevalence of the "well, I'M gonna' get MINE" attitude. Whether or not you know anything about fishing, I recommend this book. Nichols does a great job of explaining the lingo and making the reader feel like an insider, too. My only complaints are about the editing: the format and train of thought are a bit uneven, and the entire book suffers from an overuse of parenthetical asides. (It distracts from the storytelling and is often unnecessary.)(You see what I mean.)

  • Jeff Nichols
    2018-08-10 02:53

    I am the author of this book. I know pathetic/sad that I rated my own book,( I though a 3 was benign enough) I just wanted to direct interested readers to more reviews: here is review page. just some listed here. Striped bass is a firecracker issue right now, and an important fish, important subject. http://www.secondchoicecharters.com/C...

  • Kim
    2018-07-24 01:11

    Eye openerBig eye opener. Good book and recommend. Need to protect this fishery. This shed alot of light I would of imagined and more should be done to help protect the striped bass.