Read Picture Miss Seeton by Heron Carvic Online

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Miss Seeton is a retired, often bemuddled British art teacher with a slight psychic ability for drawing things more accurately than they appear. Picture Miss Seeton, the first in the series, is an absorbing novel in which an elderly and naive drawing mistress, finds herself suddenly involved in the baser side of life, becoming embroiled in a murder and its subsequent mayheMiss Seeton is a retired, often bemuddled British art teacher with a slight psychic ability for drawing things more accurately than they appear. Picture Miss Seeton, the first in the series, is an absorbing novel in which an elderly and naive drawing mistress, finds herself suddenly involved in the baser side of life, becoming embroiled in a murder and its subsequent mayhem....

Title : Picture Miss Seeton
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9789997407436
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 207 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Picture Miss Seeton Reviews

  • Ivonne Rovira
    2019-03-14 04:54

    To truly picture Miss Seeton, you must imagine a younger, less conventional Miss Marple, one who gets caught up in farcical situations through no fault of her own. While the mystery is clever and the novel is quite funny, it’s the darling Miss Seeton and her can-do spirit that really captured me.London art teacher Emily D. Seeton, a kind, dutiful forty-something spinster, encounters a murder of a French prostitute that turns out to be part of a larger scheme. Brave — or perhaps foolhardy — she drives off the murderer with her trusty umbrella. Miss Seeton can’t describe the murderer when pressed by the police — but she can draw a perfect rendition of him. Her artistic ability comes in handy more than once.Unbeknownst to Miss Seeton, that makes her a target of a crime ring, one that tries to track her down during her holiday in the Kent countryside. The village characters that author Heron Carvic describes remain as fresh and funny as they were nearly 50 years ago; truly, despite being first published in 1968, Picture Miss Seeton has aged quite well. I can’t wait to read the next in the series, Miss Seeton Draws the Line. Special thanks to Farrago for re-releasing this little gem. And thanks to whomever for making most of the re-released Miss Seeton books available on Kindle Unlimited.

  • Juli
    2019-03-15 04:58

    Miss Emily Seeton is a retired art teacher who seems to magically thwart criminals and evil-doers armed only with a trusty umbrella, grace under pressure, and her drawing talents. She is naive yet incredibly observant and astute. Miss Seeton definitely reminds me of Miss Marple, with innocent, unintentional humorous antics added. I absolutely adore her!Picture Miss Seeton is the first in the 22-book series. The book was originally published in 1968 by Heron Carvic, who wrote the first 5 Miss Seeton books. The remaining books were authored by Hampton Charles (pen name used by Roy Peter Martin) and Hamilton Crane (pen name of Sarah J. Mason). I had never heard of the Miss Seeton books before the re-release of the series by Farrago. The first 3 books are available separately, or can be purchased together as an ebook set.In this introduction to the series, Miss Seeton attends the opera. After the performance while still lamenting over Carmen's tragic end, she comes across a young man being rough with a woman. Rapping him with her umbrella, she intends to tell him off about his behavior -- young men just shouldn't accost women in the street, after all! But, as he knocks her to the ground, Miss Seeton discovers he did more than just smack the girl around a bit. As police officers and others gather to help her up, they find that the girl is dead. She's been stabbed to death. The perpetrator runs away into the night. The police are concerned about Miss Seeton's safety as the crook made off with her purse containing her address and keys, until they learn she is moving from London to a nearby village the very next day. As will happen in villages, word gets around about the heroic actions (or possibly her villainous intentions and nefarious criminal past, depending on which person is telling the story) of Miss Seeton. It might all have ended there if the village vicar didn't get tongue tied and blurt out Miss Seeton's location to the media. The criminal element follows Miss Seeton to her new home, and more run ins with evil creeps follow. She is spied upon, nearly shot, kidnapped, gassed, and almost drowned before it's all over! The police can't help but laugh as Miss Seeton miraculously uses her umbrella, laundry soap and her unfailing luck and wits to escape all attempts to do her in.This book is just a delightfully fun story! At 224 pages, it's a relatively quick read. I love Miss Seeton as a sweetly clueless amateur sleuth, who just seems to come upon the facts without even realizing it. The supporting characters, especially the police, are left following behind, often laughing, at the miraculous ways Miss Seeton dispatches justice.From murdering teenagers to shady lawyers, Miss Seeton rises to the occasion and triumphs in often hilarious ways. Thanks to Farrago, I have the next two books waiting on my Kindle. I can't wait to see what Miss Seeton gets herself involved in next!Off to start reading book 2, Miss Seeton Draws The Line. :)**I voluntarily read an advance readers copy of this book from Farrago via NetGalley. All opinions expressed are entirely my own.**

  • Trish
    2019-02-26 00:22

    A fun, quirky mystery. It did take a while for me to get used to the writing style, which was rather stream-of-consciousness, but I liked the characters. However, given the situations she found herself in, and her solutions to them, I just couldn't decide if Miss Seeton was really smart, or a female Mr Bean.

  • Damaskcat
    2019-03-10 02:02

    Miss Seeton, almost retired art teacher, leaves a performance of Carmen at Covent Garden only to witness a stabbing. Not realising what she is seeing, she prods the murderer in the back with her umbrella. After knocking her to the ground, the murderer escapes but Miss Seeton is able to draw a picture of the man she saw for a fleeting second so the police know who they're looking for. Superintendent Alan Delphick (The Oracle) is intrigued and impressed by her ability but fears she is in danger.Miss Seeton has been left a cottage in the Kent village of Plummergen but it seems her excursion into crime fighting is not destined to be her last as murder and mayhem follow her there. So often humorous crime novels just don't work in my opinion but this one does. It manages to combine an interesting plot, marvellous characters and some very funny incidents, dialogue and descriptions. I found myself laughing out loud several times as I was reading this book.The book is well written with some marvellous scenes of village life and the way rumours start and are fuelled by mis-information. I loved Miss Seeton - think Miss Marple with an umbrella - who rushes in where angels fear to tread and who has an uncanny facility for drawing her impressions of people.I look forward to reading the rest of the books in this series and I'm glad they are being re-published for a new audience. If you think crime and humour don't mix then try Miss Seeton -you may just change your mind.

  • Anne(Booklady) Molinarolo
    2019-03-13 00:56

    Picture Miss Seeton by Heron Carvic was originally published in 1968 and is a totally delightful and funny read. Careful Miss Marple, you have some competition in a retired art teacher, armed with only her trusted brolly and her drawings. Miss Seeton is slightly psychic, though she doesn't realize it. Her drawings are much more than an eye-witnessed account - they are her impressions of the situation, sometimes of what will happen. Her adventure in this novel happens after attending the play, Carmen, in Camden. She literally walks on to a murder, stabbing the young murderer with her brolly. They stumble to the ground. But before the young guy can do further harm to Miss Seeton, a man rushes to her aid. The detectives of Scotland Yard are dumbfounded by Miss Seeton. They know exactly who the murderer is. And he's involved in some other nasty business. They are relieved that Miss Seeton is going to a small village for a holiday. She arrives in the village (that is full of gossips and busybodies) and rumors and innuendos of her London heroics have reached fever-pitched heights. The bungling Vicar tells the Press of Miss Seeton's where-a-bouts, and of course the murderer is after her. Not only is Miss Seeton unaware of the danger she's in nor the fantastic stories about her, she stumbles into another mess: drugs and embezzlement. Bad guys want the elderly teacher gone - as in dead.In several places I found myself laughing with tears flowing down my cheeks. The Sargent and his boss were great comic relief. The story is quick paced and totally unpredictable. I will be reading more in the Miss Seeton Series, even though Heron Carvic wrote only the first five novels before his death in 1980.

  • Elisabeth
    2019-03-06 02:11

    I think this is the first time an automated Kindle recommendation has scored a hit for me. Picture Miss Seeton is an absolute riot. It's rather like a comedic parody of the Miss Marple type—Miss Seeton is a bit younger and more active, but much less bright spinster, whose gift seems to lie in her odd, metaphoric sketches of people which reveal things she intuitively senses about them. That, and a knack for getting into the wildest of scrapes without realizing she's done anything unusual.It all begins with Mrs. Seeton poking a rude young man in the back with her umbrella on a dark London street, unaware that she's interrupting a murder in progress. After she's able to make an identifying sketch of the culprit, Scotland Yard determines to keep a protective eye on her in case she's in danger, as the only witness. Miss Seeton heads off to take up residence in her newly-inherited cottage in a quaint country village—where it turns out there are some odd goings-on that just might be connected with the original murder.This is the clue-hunting romp type of mystery—author Carvic manages to keep a deft balance in tone between some genuinely nasty murders and the hilarity that results from Miss Seeton's being mixed up in them. (I laughed until I cried at the scene where the village rumor-mill gets going on the events by the pond.) The cast of supporting characters is wonderful, particularly a pair of very likable detectives, Superintendent Delphick (a.k.a. the Oracle) and his assistant Sergeant Bob Ranger; and Sir George and Lady Colvedon and their young son Nigel, a delightful family who participate in some of the book's best moments. (Bob and the Colvedons are my favorites in the book.) Also Dr. Knight and his family, who arrive on the scene a little later but do it in style.There's a few little loose ends—e.g. the fact that (view spoiler)[the big boss of the drug ring is never actually caught; (hide spoiler)] and it does seem a little bit of a cheat that we don't get to see everybody's reaction to the information revealed in the last few paragraphs! But it's not too far out of keeping with the tone of the book to be unsatisfying. I'm already looking forward to the next books in the series!(I understand there are four more Miss Seeton books by the original author, and that after his death other authors continued the series under his pen name. I'm interested in the rest of the original books, anyway.)

  • Orinoco Womble (tidy bag and all)
    2019-03-03 01:16

    If you want a light, cosy mystery with a touch of parody, this should be enjoyable. Written in 1968, when Britain was still on the old money system of shillings and sovereigns, villages were still full of wellstocked local shops, and computers get a glancing mention as weird new technology that exists somewhere, but can't be trusted to do much. Miss Seeton is a retired but not retiring art mistress who goes to spend her holidays in the house she has inherited from her aged godmother. (If Miss Seeton is retirement age, said godmother must have been elderly indeed.) A chance encounter on a street in London draws her into a labyrinth of drugs, murder, greed and embezzlement. Nothing daunted, she draws her way out by providing Scotland yard with artist's impressions of suspects and situations that just happen to hold the keys to more than one case.I first read this book back in the 80s, and am amused to see how my perception of the main character has changed. The second time around, I see her not so much muddle-headed as self-centred and rather judgemental. She wanders around in her own world, repeatedly "amazed", "horrified" and "shocked" at the behaviour of others. Murder doesn't seem to bother her so much as rudeness and malicious gossip. The staff room of her school must have been populated by angels--nothing like the teachers I have known and worked with all my life! Her nosiness ("must put this right") leads to more than one person getting hurt, and she blithely disobeys police orders and advice to stay out of danger--which nearly leads to her own death.Carvic enjoyed parodying Miss Marple, Miss Silver and other spinster detectives. I'm not sure why he felt the "baddy" in the first scene had to be French, unless it was to underscore that "decent" (British) folks don't do such things...shame that the French on the first page was so impossibly bad, even for Marseilles street slang, which I speak. I enjoyed the humour of everyone in authority's reaction to the bumbling, blundering brolly-brandishing Seeton, but the narration was patchy in spots. One moment the JP is telling the police about a car chase--then the narrative voice shifts abruptly to third person as the author plumps for showing instead of telling--and then back again, with no transition, to conversational "and then this happened and then that happened" leaving me feeling slightly carsick and confused.

  • Rosemary
    2019-03-04 04:55

    LOVED IT. So, Miss Seeton--the proper, aging amateur lady detective at the heart of this series--is kind of a mashup of Agatha Christie's Miss Marple (whom I loathe) and Patricia Wentworth's Miss Silver (whom I adore), with an extra dose of satire thrown in. While this mystery has that "Golden Age," village-cozy vibe, the fact that it was originally written in the 1960s allows it to be edgier than either of those series: the crimes in _Picture Miss Seeton_ all revolve around a drug ring, and the murders are nastier and more cold-blooded than they often are in cozies. Though the 22 books in this series were originally published in print between 1968 and 1999, Farrago is re-releasing these books as e-books. Only the first five in the series were written by Carvic; after his death in 1980, two other writers continued the series. Carvic's gimmick is making Miss Seeton a drawing teacher, one with an almost clairvoyant talent for sketching perpetrators and victims in ways that not only reveal their moral character, but also seem to reveal their pasts and predict their futures. Like Wentworth, Carvic has a good time both making his unlikely detective figure a target both for admiration and good-natured mocking. The narration here is sophisticated, shifting back and forth from the point of view of Miss Seeton; Scotland Yard Superintendent Delphick and his Sergeant, Bob Ranger; village gossips Miss Nuttel and Mrs. Blaine; and a number of other characters. This makes it a little difficult to follow at first, but in time the shifts become easier to follow, and add to the complexity of the narrative. All of this allows the author to begin setting up the locale of Plummergen and its inhabitants for future installments in the series. There's a lot of promise here--I'm looking forward to reading the other books in the series as Farrago releases them! NB: I received a free eARC of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  • Andrea
    2019-03-18 02:22

    I wasn't certain I'd enjoy this starting out - Miss Seeton's opening was very scatty, and the narrative leapt from person to person at an almost frantic pace. Eventually though, it settled down and became mildly humorous - a nice light read.

  • Betty
    2019-03-25 04:10

    What a treat to meet my old friend Miss Seeton. I enjoy my visits with her and all the antics that happen. There is much laughter and many smiles as Miss Seeton managed to aid the police with her drawing ability. She carries her umbrella with her. Leaving the opera house Miss Seeton interrupts a murder and is able to draw a picture of the villain for Scotland Yard. This begins her adventure as she heads toward the small town where she has inherited a house. There are several attempts to kill her.The reason she is able to escape each attempt is ingenious. I looking forward to reading her adventures again.Disclosure: I received a free copy Farrago through NetGalley for an honest review. I would like to thank them for this opportunity to read and review the book. The opinions are my own.

  • Susan
    2019-03-03 05:55

    I really wanted to like this book as it is beginning of a series but I just couldn't get into it. The main character is a younger Miss Marple type who witnesses a murder. The catch is she is an Art teacher able to replicate the killers face through her drawing. She moves to an late elderly relatives home in the country and meets a series of quirky characters. It should be good but the writing just doesn't do it for me, it seems bitty and confused at times. The characters are annoying and the scenes move quickly from one place to another with no explanation. I really wanted to stick with it but gave up half way through. Not for me.

  • Kathy Davie
    2019-03-11 03:11

    First in the Heron Carvic's Miss Seeton too-funny mystery series sharing adventures between London and a village in Kent.This ARC was sent to me by NetGalley and Farrago for an honest review.My TakeIf you like the homey qualities of Agatha Christie, you will very much enjoy Carvic's Miss Seeton! She's a no-nonsense, logical lady who firmly believes in manners. Much to some bad boys' chagrin! She's also naive in believing that everyone will behave the same way, which turns Picture Miss Seeton into a comedy of logic versus gossip with the villagers seeing Miss Seeton's logical approach to life as eccentric. One of those logical moves — that one doesn't expect from a "little old lady" — is Miss Seeton taking up yoga.It's that insistence on manners that starts the action off and her reaction to it all that brings out Delphick's protective instincts. He's quite pleased that the murderer doesn't know of Miss Seeton's plans for the morrow, and that she'll be right out the way of any danger.Oh, well.Superintendent Delphick is quick to take advantage of Miss Seeton's naiveté. The surprising part is that one wouldn't expect the 1960s coppers being all that "psychic" themselves! Or that quick to accept. The whole story was rather like that. A sense of trust and caring that we, in general, lack today.It's a soap opera-like approach to drugs and crime — the sort that brings to mind Reefer Madness, there are police who use their heads, there are some villagers who are practical and kindly while others take much too much joy in embellishing their own "hopes" into a mish-mash of entangled gossip with all sorts of nonsensical ideas thrown into the ether about the "truth" behind Miss Seeton and her activities. The two Nuts are a hoot even if I do want to smash 'em left, right, and center. I do love what Miss Seeton does to them in the post office!Carvic does have his fun with the English attitude toward anyone not English. Ooh, ar, them furriners don't half know how to behave…bein' foreign-like and all. Miss Seeton is quite the levelheaded lady, and never more so than when she first meets the Oracle. Poor Ranger has no idea what he's in for, but she is a nice bit of relief for the cops.The atmosphere feel like the 1900s, but it must be set in the 1960s somewhere. Or maybe not. There is one mention of a computer, so I haven't a clue. There's lots of talk of having a car sent and there is a regular bus route that goes through the village, so it's sufficiently confusing as to when the story takes place.One must appreciate the reverend. His heart is in the right place. If only he didn't leap to conclusions so quickly! Poor DS Bob comes in for quite a bit of quiet teasing. Then Anne and her aborted seductions, poor girl, lol. The chasing in which Nigel and Sir George engage. The rabbitin', *laughing*.I do love Lady Colvedon, Sir George, and Nigel. They're truly decent people with a wicked sense of humor who know what's going on around them."Wife always first suspect. Hire someone. Don't let 'em overcharge."All the juggling about as the villagers try to figure out a welcoming gift for Miss Seeton was too funny. The hen house war yields names and great adventure for Sir George and Nigel as they hare off to battle in her ladyship's MG. The kidnapping that goes in reverse and ends for young Ginger when Miss Seeton gets indignant at the hearing over her crushed hat.That Morton was a real piece of work. I did get confused by a statement that Mrs. Venning had been socially active until a year ago when earlier (and later) Carvic makes it sound as though Mrs. Venning has been a hermit for years.Oh lord, I do enjoy the occasional lapses into parody…Miss Seeton's comment about laying her own has Nigel envisioning "Miss Seeton, in that hat, enthroned on an outsized nesting box" while later Delphick gets this image of himself cleaning up the drug smuggling ring with a boiling teakettle.Miss Seeton did have a tricky way of getting out of that kidnapping. Oh, and you can just hear some idjit criminal using that same damned excuse…!! Arghhhh! I did love the judge's reaction when Miss Seeton had her say in court, lol.I can't really blame Nigel for taking the piss with Delphick:"'Sarcasm and rudeness aren't exactly helpful.'"I quite agree,' retorted Nigel, 'but I don't see why it should be one-way traffic.'"That comment Miss Seeton makes about the "gardener" who wrote How Does Your Garden Grow? cracked me up.He explains her to Bob as "everybody's conscience, . . . Humanity's backbone . . . [going] to the stake for you again and again; . . . as a matter of principle".A thought that has Bob wondering about emigrating to Canada where the Mounties only ever get their "man". Certainly Brinton is moaning about how quiet the area used to be before she showed with her brolly in action.ROFLMAO, lucky Delphick is about to get his dream come true…Lebel trussed up and packaged for him. You'll never guess how it comes about, ROFL.Picture Miss Seeton was an absolute treat. An author who actually knew how to write and did so with intelligence.The StoryIt all starts with a murder in London and a poke with a brolly, which brings Miss Seeton to the attention of both Scotland Yard and the bad guys. Her frustration and Delphick's noting that she's a drawing teacher begins the connection between Miss Seeton and Delphick.With that comes protective surveillance, newspaper publicity, and the Nuts' obsession with "creativity" combined with a nap and the pot of jam from Mrs. and Miss Vennings sends the Nuts off with gossip that alternates between drug running, vendettas, and lord knows what else.And Miss Seeton heads down to Sweetbriars blissfully unaware of the press or the gossip shortly to be swirling about her. She'll be drawn deeper into the mix when she listens to Nigel as he sweats out his problem. The one that brings Miss Seeton deeper into the mix, tying the threads into one great clump.The CharactersMiss Emily Seeton is a drawing instructor for a private school in London and never seen without her umbrella. Her godmother and a cousin twice removed, Mrs. Flora Bannet, has just died and left Miss Seeton her cottage, Sweetbriars.Scotland YardSuperintendent Delphick, a.k.a., the Oracle, and Detective Sergeant Bob Ranger are both with Scotland Yard. I like them both for their warm hearts: Delphick is level-headed and quick while Bob is more inclined to a Boy Scout approach. Harry is running some prints. Chief Superintendent Gosslin is Delphick's boss.Plummergen, Kent is……where Miss Seeton's inheritance lies. Martha Bloomer had been Mrs. Bannet's cleaning lady for years ("Flora always said Martha must have been born in the middle of a conversation") and has stayed on to help Miss Seeton (she also cleans for Lady Colvedon). She's rather known for her "Grand Slams". Her husband, Stan, did the garden and the chickens in a barter arrangement.Major-General Sir George Colveden, the local justice of the peace, and Meg, Lady Colvedon, live at Rytham Hall with their son, Nigel, who is studying agriculture. An older daughter is married and lives in London.Mrs. Sonia Vennings is a widow who turned to writing and has earned enough off her children's books about Jack the Rabbit, his friend Lucy, and his enemy Wally Weasel to move to the Meadows with her poor, bored daughter, Angela, hostage to her mother's past. David is the husband who died. Mrs. Fratters is their housekeeper and had been Sonia's nurse when she was a child.The Reverend Arthur Treeves is the bachelor vicar who has lost his faith. And a more woolly-headed one with a profound dislike for social chit-chat I can't imagine. His sister, Molly Treeves, is much more levelheaded and intelligent — she keeps her brother up-to-date.Dr. Knight runs the local surgery and a small nursing care home with the help of his daughter Anne, who has caught DS Ranger's eye. You'll like the doctor…a wicked sense of humor: "Bob following: a leviathan in tow to a tiny tug".Erica "Eric" Nuttel and Norah "Bunny" Blaine have shared a house, Lilikot (ahem, a.k.a., the Nut House), for eleven years in the center of the village opposite the garage". I'm sure they'll never move unless the village can unite in tossing them across the county. They're much too interested in whatever is happening around them and not too concerned with truth. In fact, embroidering is so much more fun, and they spread their inventions about with glee. Most of the village refers to them together as the "Nuts" and individually as "Nutcrackers" and "Hot Cross Bun" respectively.PC Potter is the village constable with orders to keep an eye on Miss Seeton. His comments to that effect only seem to fuel the village gossip in the wrong direction. Jack Crabbe runs the local garage and petrol station and hires himself out to drive people about. Mrs. Walsted runs the local draper's with the help of her daughter, Margery. Mrs. Goffer and Mrs. Spice are encountered in the grocer's. Doris is the waitress at The George and Dragon. Mr. Stillman runs the post office.AshfordChief Detective Inspector Chris Brinton of the Ashford Criminal Investigation Department gets involved when the action moves into Kent…with Miss Seeton. Hubert Trefold Morton, solicitor, alderman, and mayor-expectant of Brettenden is Miss Seeton's solicitor. An annoyingly loud man with his fingers in many, many pies. Some of his previous clients include Mrs. Cummingdale with the angry nephew, Ernest Foremason, Miss Worlingham, and Miss Hant. His housekeeper doesn't think much of him, either.The Singing Swan is a youth club on the other side of Brettenden. Art Grant, Micky Hughes, Sue Frith, Diana Dean, James Trugg, and John Hart are habitués.César Lebel is the young "foreigner" who starts it all with the murder of the young prostitute, Marie Prévost Hickson. Ginger Nut is the close-mouthed kidnapper.Mabel and Edward Walters came to Miss Seeton's aid in London. Mrs. Perrsons is a nosy neighbor in London.The Cover and TitleIt's a pastel rainbow reflecting the light humor of the story. A yellow-on-yellow sky against which a melon-colored village silhouette stands out. The melon degrades down to a pale peach at the bottom, and in between, is a tall dark purple silhouette of Miss Seeton unfurling her Battlin' Brolly, pointing it at Lady Colveden's used and abused MG with a pretty blue graphic of Sweetbriars tucked in the title.The title is part of our introduction to Miss Seeton's abilities to Picture Miss Seeton, as she plumbs the depths of her artistic insight into the people around her.

  • Kathy Davie
    2019-03-01 00:02

    First read in 2011 and again 29 April 2016.First in the Heron Carvic's Miss Seeton too-funny mystery series sharing adventures between London and a village in Kent.This ARC was sent to me by NetGalley and Farrago for an honest review.My TakeIf you like the homey qualities of Agatha Christie, you will very much enjoy Carvic's Miss Seeton! She's a no-nonsense, logical lady who firmly believes in manners. Much to some bad boys' chagrin! She's also naive in believing that everyone will behave the same way, which turns Picture Miss Seeton into a comedy of logic versus gossip with the villagers seeing Miss Seeton's logical approach to life as eccentric. One of those logical moves — that one doesn't expect from a "little old lady" — is Miss Seeton taking up yoga.It's that insistence on manners that starts the action off and her reaction to it all that brings out Delphick's protective instincts. He's quite pleased that the murderer doesn't know of Miss Seeton's plans for the morrow, and that she'll be right out the way of any danger.Oh, well.Superintendent Delphick is quick to take advantage of Miss Seeton's naiveté. The surprising part is that one wouldn't expect the 1960s coppers being all that "psychic" themselves! Or that quick to accept. The whole story was rather like that. A sense of trust and caring that we, in general, lack today.It's a soap opera-like approach to drugs and crime — the sort that brings to mind Reefer Madness, there are police who use their heads, there are some villagers who are practical and kindly while others take much too much joy in embellishing their own "hopes" into a mish-mash of entangled gossip with all sorts of nonsensical ideas thrown into the ether about the "truth" behind Miss Seeton and her activities. The two Nuts are a hoot even if I do want to smash 'em left, right, and center. I do love what Miss Seeton does to them in the post office!Carvic does have his fun with the English attitude toward anyone not English. Ooh, ar, them furriners don't half know how to behave…bein' foreign-like and all. Miss Seeton is quite the levelheaded lady, and never more so than when she first meets the Oracle. Poor Ranger has no idea what he's in for, but she is a nice bit of relief for the cops.The atmosphere feel like the 1900s, but it must be set in the 1960s somewhere. Or maybe not. There is one mention of a computer, so I haven't a clue. There's lots of talk of having a car sent and there is a regular bus route that goes through the village, so it's sufficiently confusing as to when the story takes place.One must appreciate the reverend. His heart is in the right place. If only he didn't leap to conclusions so quickly! Poor DS Bob comes in for quite a bit of quiet teasing. Then Anne and her aborted seductions, poor girl, lol. The chasing in which Nigel and Sir George engage. The rabbitin', *laughing*.I do love Lady Colvedon, Sir George, and Nigel. They're truly decent people with a wicked sense of humor who know what's going on around them."Wife always first suspect. Hire someone. Don't let 'em overcharge."All the juggling about as the villagers try to figure out a welcoming gift for Miss Seeton was too funny. The hen house war yields names and great adventure for Sir George and Nigel as they hare off to battle in her ladyship's MG. The kidnapping that goes in reverse and ends for young Ginger when Miss Seeton gets indignant at the hearing over her crushed hat.That Morton was a real piece of work. I did get confused by a statement that Mrs. Venning had been socially active until a year ago when earlier (and later) Carvic makes it sound as though Mrs. Venning has been a hermit for years.Oh lord, I do enjoy the occasional lapses into parody…Miss Seeton's comment about laying her own has Nigel envisioning "Miss Seeton, in that hat, enthroned on an outsized nesting box" while later Delphick gets this image of himself cleaning up the drug smuggling ring with a boiling teakettle.Miss Seeton did have a tricky way of getting out of that kidnapping. Oh, and you can just hear some idjit criminal using that same damned excuse…!! Arghhhh! I did love the judge's reaction when Miss Seeton had her say in court, lol.I can't really blame Nigel for taking the piss with Delphick:"'Sarcasm and rudeness aren't exactly helpful.'"I quite agree,' retorted Nigel, 'but I don't see why it should be one-way traffic.'"That comment Miss Seeton makes about the "gardener" who wrote How Does Your Garden Grow? cracked me up.He explains her to Bob as "everybody's conscience, . . . Humanity's backbone . . . [going] to the stake for you again and again; . . . as a matter of principle".A thought that has Bob wondering about emigrating to Canada where the Mounties only ever get their "man". Certainly Brinton is moaning about how quiet the area used to be before she showed with her brolly in action.ROFLMAO, lucky Delphick is about to get his dream come true…Lebel trussed up and packaged for him. You'll never guess how it comes about, ROFL.Picture Miss Seeton was an absolute treat. An author who actually knew how to write and did so with intelligence.The StoryIt all starts with a murder in London and a poke with a brolly, which brings Miss Seeton to the attention of both Scotland Yard and the bad guys. Her frustration and Delphick's noting that she's a drawing teacher begins the connection between Miss Seeton and Delphick.With that comes protective surveillance, newspaper publicity, and the Nuts' obsession with "creativity" combined with a nap and the pot of jam from Mrs. and Miss Vennings sends the Nuts off with gossip that alternates between drug running, vendettas, and lord knows what else.And Miss Seeton heads down to Sweetbriars blissfully unaware of the press or the gossip shortly to be swirling about her. She'll be drawn deeper into the mix when she listens to Nigel as he sweats out his problem. The one that brings Miss Seeton deeper into the mix, tying the threads into one great clump.The CharactersMiss Emily Seeton is a drawing instructor for a private school in London and never seen without her umbrella. Her godmother and a cousin twice removed, Mrs. Flora Bannet, has just died and left Miss Seeton her cottage, Sweetbriars.Scotland YardSuperintendent Delphick, a.k.a., the Oracle, and Detective Sergeant Bob Ranger are both with Scotland Yard. I like them both for their warm hearts: Delphick is level-headed and quick while Bob is more inclined to a Boy Scout approach. Harry is running some prints. Chief Superintendent Gosslin is Delphick's boss.Plummergen, Kent is……where Miss Seeton's inheritance lies. Martha Bloomer had been Mrs. Bannet's cleaning lady for years ("Flora always said Martha must have been born in the middle of a conversation") and has stayed on to help Miss Seeton (she also cleans for Lady Colvedon). She's rather known for her "Grand Slams". Her husband, Stan, did the garden and the chickens in a barter arrangement.Major-General Sir George Colveden, the local justice of the peace, and Meg, Lady Colvedon, live at Rytham Hall with their son, Nigel, who is studying agriculture. An older daughter is married and lives in London.Mrs. Sonia Vennings is a widow who turned to writing and has earned enough off her children's books about Jack the Rabbit, his friend Lucy, and his enemy Wally Weasel to move to the Meadows with her poor, bored daughter, Angela, hostage to her mother's past. David is the husband who died. Mrs. Fratters is their housekeeper and had been Sonia's nurse when she was a child.The Reverend Arthur Treeves is the bachelor vicar who has lost his faith. And a more woolly-headed one with a profound dislike for social chit-chat I can't imagine. His sister, Molly Treeves, is much more levelheaded and intelligent — she keeps her brother up-to-date.Dr. Knight runs the local surgery and a small nursing care home with the help of his daughter Anne, who has caught DS Ranger's eye. You'll like the doctor…a wicked sense of humor: "Bob following: a leviathan in tow to a tiny tug".Erica "Eric" Nuttel and Norah "Bunny" Blaine have shared a house, Lilikot (ahem, a.k.a., the Nut House), for eleven years in the center of the village opposite the garage". I'm sure they'll never move unless the village can unite in tossing them across the county. They're much too interested in whatever is happening around them and not too concerned with truth. In fact, embroidering is so much more fun, and they spread their inventions about with glee. Most of the village refers to them together as the "Nuts" and individually as "Nutcrackers" and "Hot Cross Bun" respectively.PC Potter is the village constable with orders to keep an eye on Miss Seeton. His comments to that effect only seem to fuel the village gossip in the wrong direction. Jack Crabbe runs the local garage and petrol station and hires himself out to drive people about. Mrs. Walsted runs the local draper's with the help of her daughter, Margery. Mrs. Goffer and Mrs. Spice are encountered in the grocer's. Doris is the waitress at The George and Dragon. Mr. Stillman runs the post office.AshfordChief Detective Inspector Chris Brinton of the Ashford Criminal Investigation Department gets involved when the action moves into Kent…with Miss Seeton. Hubert Trefold Morton, solicitor, alderman, and mayor-expectant of Brettenden is Miss Seeton's solicitor. An annoyingly loud man with his fingers in many, many pies. Some of his previous clients include Mrs. Cummingdale with the angry nephew, Ernest Foremason, Miss Worlingham, and Miss Hant. His housekeeper doesn't think much of him, either.The Singing Swan is a youth club on the other side of Brettenden. Art Grant, Micky Hughes, Sue Frith, Diana Dean, James Trugg, and John Hart are habitués.César Lebel is the young "foreigner" who starts it all with the murder of the young prostitute, Marie Prévost Hickson. Ginger Nut is the close-mouthed kidnapper.Mabel and Edward Walters came to Miss Seeton's aid in London. Mrs. Perrsons is a nosy neighbor in London.The Cover and TitleIt's a pastel rainbow reflecting the light humor of the story. A yellow-on-yellow sky against which a melon-colored village silhouette stands out. The melon degrades down to a pale peach at the bottom, and in between, is a tall dark purple silhouette of Miss Seeton unfurling her Battlin' Brolly, pointing it at Lady Colveden's used and abused MG with a pretty blue graphic of Sweetbriars tucked in the title.The title is part of our introduction to Miss Seeton's abilities to Picture Miss Seeton, as she plumbs the depths of her artistic insight into the people around her.

  • Richard
    2019-03-27 00:59

    The first book of an apparently fairly long series, this mystery was first published in 1968. It stands up well today, having attained only a slight retro patina. Miss Seeton, a retired teacher of art/drawing, is an amusing character who moves blithely through life (usually with her umbrella handy) while everything sort of erupts into chaos around her. In this story, she witnesses a murder practically on page one while returning from the opera. That's in London. She soon goes to visit a cottage in the country which she recently inherited, but will have to return for an inquest. The reader then gets a quite long parade of eccentric village denizens whose part in the plot isn't immediately apparent. (But who doesn't love a parade, right?) A lot of odd occurrences follow on her visit, and the police inspector gradually comes to realize that Miss Seeton's drawings are often sort of prophetic and symbolic, containing clues to the mystery.There was an odd (to me) feeling about some of the narrative segments, particularly when the prose gives us the unfiltered inner-mind workings of some older male. The prose gets choppy and a little full of harrumph. I suppose such things help characterize these actors, but I wasn't sure if I liked the style entirely. Other than that, the writing is perfectly delightful and the characters enjoyable (except when they shouldn't be). I would easily read another in the series, perhaps more...I read the newly republished and gussied-up e-book version with a nice afterword about the author and his life. And I obtained the book for free via one of those daily offers on the mighty 'Zon.I think this may fulfill my self-assigned check-off item, "one token book by a male author" for the year, but we'll see...

  • AudioBookReviewer
    2019-03-10 07:01

    My original Picture Miss Seeton audiobook review and many others can be found at Audiobook Reviewer.Picture Miss Seeton: A Miss Seeton Mystery, Book 1 is a light cozy mystery that is fun and entertaining.  Miss Seeton finds herself involved in a murder and lots of trouble!  As a retired art teacher, Miss Seeton has no trouble finding trouble – it finds her!  Miss Seeton witnesses a stabbing, gets involved with Juvenile Delinquents and more.  At least she has her trusty umbrella and is most helpful to Scotland Yard!If you enjoy British humor, this is perfect for you.  Miss Seeton is eccentric, English and carries a deadly umbrella!  As she tries to solve the crime, through her sketches one must wonder if the murderer will get her first!This was an enjoyable mystery.  The narrator, Phyllida Nash, provided a wonderful performance.  Her voice was soothing yet sounded just like one would expect an English Spinster to sound like.  Well-developed the story flowed smoothly and Nash kept it going with her natural performance.If you enjoy cozy mysteries, this is a fun one.Audiobook was provided for review by the publisher.Please find this complete review and many others at my review blog

  • Julia
    2019-03-20 06:23

    Steeped in all things mystery since early adolescence, I can't believe I have never read a Miss Seeton book (that I can recall) until now! This book is a prime example of what I consider the classic British mystery, with the added whimsy of Miss Seeton herself innocently stumbling into and out of chaos. Miss Seetong must have a seriously overworked guardian angel...Miss Seeton has treated herself to a seat at the opera before going on holiday in the country. Walking home from the performance of Carmen, she unwittingly stumbles onto a murder in progress. Mistaking the murderer for a "rude young man", Miss Seeton pokes the killer with her umbrella as a reminder to mind his manners. Bumbling, stumbling and chaos ensues as the police realize Miss Seeton is able to identify her "attacker" and as the thug in question attempts to ensure her silence.The denouement of this story wasn't a particular surprise because "whodunnit" was obvious from the start and the whys-and-wherefores were revealed in the course of the story. Nevertheless, it was an entertaining and enjoyable read. After all, the point is to be a part of Miss Seeton's adventures, and they are great fun!

  • C-shaw
    2019-03-15 04:15

    Thanks to my Goodreads friend Orinoco Womble (tidy bag and all) for recommending the Miss Seeton books. This free e-book download is the first of the series which has at least 22 books, some written by a second author after original Heron Carvic died.* * * * *I LOVE Miss Seeton! Such a delightful story with good characters. I can't wait to read more and to see how the story changed with two writers who took over the series after Mr. Carvic's tragic death. This is a good, sweet cozy with charming British slang and settings."She'd always liked the cottage; but it was curious how much more personal--no, to be honest--how much more lovable a place became when it belonged to you, when you got that first little awareness that, perhaps, you belonged to it.""What's the good of feelings if you can't find sufficient evidence to support them."

  • Kam
    2019-03-08 03:20

    I was quite looking forward to this series and new author so bought the first 3 books. I really liked the characters and the story but just didn't enjoy the read because of the disjointed writing style. For me, the writing style detracted from the flow of the story.

  • zjakkelien
    2019-03-03 06:08

    I thought the language was a bit confusing at times, and the story was thin, but the main character was charming and entertaining.

  • Carla Johnson-Hicks
    2019-03-22 01:14

    This book was originally Published in 1968 and has just been reissued. If you want a light, cozy mystery with a touch of parody, you should enjoy this book. The story takes place in a small village that is relatively self-sufficient, but only has about 500 inhabitants. The villagers are enjoyable for the most part but very different. You have the vicar who has lost his belief but is too lazy to change careers, and his sister, Sir George, his wife and son Nigel as well as many others. They are all busy bodies and when the find out that Miss Seeton took on a murderer with her umbrella, they all want to know what happened. Every incident that she is involved in becomes fraught with rumor and inuendo in the village. Miss Seeton is a retired art teacher who has inherited a house from her aged cousin/godmother. After leaving a performance of Carmen in London, she stumbles onto a murder that draws her into a mystery involving drugs, murder, greed and embezzlement. She seems to bumble her way into situations and uses her trusted brolly to save the day. When questioned by the police, she draws her way out by providing Scotland yard with artist's impressions of suspects and situations that just happen to hold the keys to more than one case. Her pictures show her impressions of the subject, not just a picture of the faces. The various police officers also add some comic relief to the stories. There are five books in this series and so far they have reissued 3 of them. I am going to try another one in the series and see if I enjoy it a little more.I received a copy of this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

  • Ian
    2019-03-25 05:18

    Meet retired art teacher Miss Emily D. Seeton, a gentle parody of Agatha Christie's Miss Marple. If you can follow the conversations of Miss Marple, you will love Miss Seeton!Heron Carvic's Miss Seeton books are a joy to read from start to finish. As Miss Seeton wrecks havoc in the Kent countryside.I'm glad to see these classic mysteries back in circulation once more. I love them.Further adventures of Miss Emily D. Seeton.Book #2 - Miss Seeton Draws the Line. - May 2016Book #3 - Witch Miss Seeton. - June 2016Hopefully Farrago are set to re-publish all 22 books.ARC honest review for Farrago via NetGalley.If you like the review and would like to read reviews on other books I have made, visit my blog at www.finalchapterreadersgroup.wordpres... like, comment and follow.

  • Almeta
    2019-03-18 02:22

    Miss Seeton never "gets a clue", yet provides clues galore. She has a remarkable ability to observe things, but never correctly interprets them. She is surrounded by mayhem and criminal activity but only notices "bad manners" as a punishable crime, for which she delivers a swift swat of an umbrella.She is not interested in solving anything more mysterious than how to maintain a garden. Yet, as long as Scotland Yard and the local authorities can keep up with her...they nab plenty of ne'er do wells!When in the mood for a cozy, after a hard week of playing cops and robbers (and murderers), I will slowly be reading all of the Miss Seeton series.

  • Georgiann Hennelly
    2019-02-24 05:58

    I received a free copy from Net Galley in exchange for an honest review.Miss Seeton is an aging amateur Lady Detective, this story was originally written in the 1960's Which gives it a certain flare. Miss Seeton is a logical no nonsense lady she firmly believes in manners. She is also naive in some ways.. The villagers all see her logical approach to life as eccentric. One of her more logical moves is to take up yoga. Superintendent Delphrick is quick to use Miss Seeton's naivete to his advantage. I really enjoyed this book proper attention was paid to police procedure and the following of clues but i really enjoyed the characters themselves except for the villian's

  • Beth
    2019-03-14 07:56

    In Picture Miss Seeton by Heron Cavoric, Miss Emily Seeton is a loveably elderly amateur detective in the style of Miss Marple. After leaving a performance of Carmen she unwittingly witnesses the murder of a young prostitute. What follows is a wonderfully funny investigation by Scotland Yard , Miss Seeton and the entire village of Plummergen., England. In a mix of attempted murder, murder, gossip, drugs, more gossip and busybodies, you have a wonderful story full of laughs and twists. This book was pure enjoyment in a book and I look forward to meeting Miss Seeton in another mystery.I receives a copy of this book from NetGalley and Farrago Publishing in exchange for a fair review

  • Cori
    2019-03-20 06:04

    What an enjoyable story. I just love a good mystery! The main character of this series, Miss Seeton, reminds me of one of my favorite mystery/crime fighting females, Agatha Raisin, by M.C. Beaton. This is an easy, fun read. Something any old fashioned mystery enthusiast would love. I can’t wait to get started on the next title, Miss Seeton Draws the Line.

  • Susan
    2019-03-09 07:21

    The writer has to decide if Miss Seeton is a doddering old fool or a sharp, smart woman. He can't have it both ways as he seems wont to do here. Miss Seeton might have appeal, but it is not evident in this story.

  • Patty
    2019-03-06 04:22

    Picture Miss SetonByHeron CarvicWhat it's all about...So...this is the very first Miss Seeton book written by the original author. I just finished the last Miss Seeton book but now that I have read the first one...the town, the characters and all of the circumstances are so much more clear. Miss Seeton is an art teacher who seems to get herself in and out of precarious situations armed with only her brolly/umbrella. In this first book she is coming out of the theatre and walks by a man fighting with a woman. The result of this has Miss Seeton at the police station using her talents to draw what happened for the investigators. Miss Seeton believes she is done with all of this "stuff" but her involvement in this is really just beginning. Why I wanted to read it...The characters, the writing, the situations are so appealing. The characters are both low key and over the top. Miss Seeton has inherited a cottage in the town of Plummergen. Plummergen is a town where gossip, rumors and tons of misinformation sort of breed and grow. What made me truly enjoy this book...I loved getting to know the characters...they are so quirky and often annoying...but annoying in a good way. This book has almost every crime there is...murder, theft, attempted murder and drugs! And Miss Seeton was accidentally...or not...involved in it all! Why you should read it, too...If you love cozy quirky mysteries...this is a series that is very enjoyable. My only concern with this first book is that I did not like the ending...it made what happened confusing for me. My copy came from NetGalley!

  • Bethany
    2019-03-09 04:12

    I bought this book last year entirely because Phyllida Nash did the narration, and I love her Georgette Heyer books. So happy I did, because this was really enjoyable! Miss Seeton is a retired(ish) art teacher who inherits a cottage in an English countryside. She is also just a tad psychic through her art which was a nice twist! She witnesses a murder, hits a villain with her umbrella and becomes embroiled in a drug ring and embezzlement scheme. She is a wonderful character! Full of spunk and kindness, and also rather naive. She reminded me a wee bit of Amelia Bedelia at times, which made me smile! All the background characters are wonderful. Some people in the village are kind, some are catty gossips, they all added so nicely to the ambience of the story. All the supposition about Miss Seeton was hilarious! All the busy bodies wondering about her connections to crime and police made for some great giggles. I didn't realise that it was first published in 1968, so it does have a bit of an old-fashioned vibe while still having phones, cars and all that. I do wish the author would mention how old Miss Seeton was, because I kept picturing her as much younger than she was! The mystery wasn't scary or gory, which made for a pleasant read.

  • Naomi
    2019-02-28 03:54

    This series was conceived by the author as a lighthearted spoof of the popular elderly British spinster detective mysteries. In Carvic's vision of Miss Seeton, she was everyone's somewhat "barmy" aunt. Retired art teacher Miss Seeton is very much the stumbler, the bumbler, the "accident waiting to happen" wrapped up in innocence and an unwavering belief that nothing unladylike ever happens to ladies. Therefore she fails to see the significance of the events happening to and because of her. When she comes upon a young ruffian assaulting a young woman, she assumes he is acting in a manner unbecoming a gentleman and prods him in the back with her umbrella. What she fails to see, in her innocence, is that she has interrupted a murder! And so begins the series of mishaps that is the crime solving of the throughly enjoyable, if sometimes bewildering Miss Seeton. She becomes both the bane and the heroine of Scotland Yard in a manner that only beloved eccentric favorite aunts can, I suppose. I loved this series when I first discovered it years ago and the books written by Carvic himself are my favorites. Not great literature by any means but highly entertaining.

  • Chelle
    2019-03-24 06:23

    I selected the audiobook due to Phyllida Nash's narration.- perfect. The story originally started out with a very 'golden era' mystery feel to it. Miss Seeton is not golden era, she's an elderly, ladylike, spinster in a more modern time who has psychic drawing, as in artistic, powers, practices yoga, and has an umbrella as her lucky talisman.Carvic repeatedly refers to "Alice in Wonderland" throughout the book - I eventually made the connection - which explains why the book has a slightly offbeat, Madhatter, tone to it. The ending has that same offbeat feel, it doesn't resolve the question, "What happened to the body in the cupboard?".Extra content others may like to know about before handing to your teen: Carvic has his villain in the book ruthlessly ending someone's life (I wasn't prepared for it, the focus was on Miss Seeton's plight, the author just tossed it down the 'rabbit hole'). The story centres around drugs, their pushers and victims.