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From the back cover ...POTIONS OF THE CARIBBEAN strains five centuries of West Indian history through a cocktail shaker, serving up 77 vintage Caribbean drink recipes – 16 of them “lost” recipes that have never before been published anywhere in any form, and another 19 that have never been published in book form. Even more delicious are the stories of the people who createFrom the back cover ...POTIONS OF THE CARIBBEAN strains five centuries of West Indian history through a cocktail shaker, serving up 77 vintage Caribbean drink recipes – 16 of them “lost” recipes that have never before been published anywhere in any form, and another 19 that have never been published in book form. Even more delicious are the stories of the people who created, or served, or simply drank these drinks. As “a hybrid of street-smart gumshoe, anthropologist and mixologist” (The Los Angeles Times), Jeff “Beachbum” Berry is uniquely qualified to tell this epic story-with-recipes, lavishly illustrated with vintage graphics and rare historical photos.A sampling of reviews....“With his new encyclopedic and entertaining ‘Beachbum Berry’s Potions of the Caribbean,’ the tiki expert Jeff Berry distills 500 years of tropical-drink history into 300-plus pages. He takes you from the days of pirates, explorers and sugar plantations to the adventures of those twin purveyors of Polynesian fantasy, Don the Beachcomber and Trader Vic, not to mention the forgotten career of the master tiki barman Joe Scialom, who seems to have worked in every swank postwar bar in New York.” — Robert Simonson, THE NEW YORK TIMES“Berry, one of the instigators of the cocktail revolution, has heretofore confined himself to covering the strange subculture of mid-2oth-century tippling known as tiki. Tiki drinks are a mutation of the rum drinks of the Caribbean, and with this book Berry turns his gifts for research and snappy, incisive prose to the source, chronicling 500 years’ worth of colorful personalities, potent drinks, and bad behavior.” — David Wondrich, ESQUIRE MAGAZINE“You’ll pick this up for the recipes, but find yourself captivated by the arcana, such as JFK’s preference for daiquiris made with the addition of canned limeade, and the influence of the Panama Canal Zone on tippling trends.” — Wayne Curtis, THE WALL STREET JOURNAL“Tiki historian Jeff Berry’s magnum opus.” — Jim Meehan, NEW YORK MAGAZINE...

Title : potions of the caribbean 500 years of tropical drinks and the people behind them
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 20730875
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 317 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

potions of the caribbean 500 years of tropical drinks and the people behind them Reviews

  • Christopher Zulueta
    2019-03-12 08:23

    The ultimate guide to tikis history as well a European exploration and conquest of "land-grabbing" during the era of imperialism, slavery, and pirating (along with old Indian and colonial libations). Jeff Berry covers the creation of the much debated Mai Tai (Trader Vic vs Don the Beachcomber) as well as a nod to the long forgotten Joe Scialom (a giant whom spoke 9 languages and masterfully designed cocktail blue prints while believing 3/4 of the cocktail was customers perception of the creation and garnish). The most fascinating aspect of the book to me was prohibition-era Havana and the Americanized country of Cuba where gambling and vice were led by Batista & a Chicago mobster. It was only at this point where the daiquiri could be perfected by a Galician Constante Ribalaigua whom is credited for inspiring many bartenders around the world (as well as writers and movie stars). Read this book if interested in all things Caribbean (1500-1970s).

  • Andy Montero
    2019-03-13 02:35

    Jeff Beachbum Berry has done for tropical drinks what Mad Men has done for the 1960s: infused a wonderful story with a historical backdrop that makes the tale (and history) even more compelling. Only, the Bum's characters are real! From Christopher Columbus to Ernest Hemingway and Jimmy Buffet, Potions of the Caribbean pays tribute to the cocktails and the creators who made them famous. This is a must-read for any fan of Tiki drinks with a thirst for historical knowledge. Bravo, Mr. Berry!

  • Scott
    2019-03-08 02:43

    I received this book as a gift and originally planned to use it primarily for the recipes. This would have been a mistake. While Berry claims to be writing a book about cocktails, he has inadvertently written a fascinating and well-researched history of the tropics spanning from early discovery through colonialism and the slave trade and up to today. Given the importance of alcohol, he tells about how we influenced the region and how the region's culture permeated our own. I find all of this context makes all tropical drinks more enjoyable (as they now tell a story) and is invaluable in thinking of new drinks to make. Overall, a creative approach to telling the story of drinks through the story of a geography and culture.

  • Barry
    2019-03-08 05:32

    This is an absolutely beautiful book I will go back to again and again. I'd say 90% of my reading is via e-readers but I got this hardback book via import and it is simply delightful.It is a joy to hold and a joy to flick through. The art direction in the book is excellent - as well as photographs, there are kitsch menus, tourist leaflets, maps and so much more. The spirit of the Caribbean cocktail history at any point of time is vividly illustrated and captures so much of the culture.Ostensibly I bought this as 'another cocktail book' as I'm really fond of other books by the Beachbum. However, the book is so much more than a cocktail book. Yes, the history of the Caribbean is presented through it's drinks history and on that level the book works well. It's also a history book as Berry goes back to the indigenous inhabitants of the islands when covering the work.I loved the chapters on early invaders, the slave trade and the era of piracy. Informative, engaging and interesting - Berry is a very good writer as he captures the personalities of everyone from drunken film stars to buccaneering pirates. The chapters on pre-Revolutionary Cuba and the Tiki explosion are fantastic. I'd always known that Tiki was effectively an American creation but I had never appreciated that Tiki drinks were basically Caribbean based and Tiki-fied for American drinkers and diners. The stories of influential celebrities and famous drinkers are covered well. What I really like about Berry's writing is that he is very opinionated - he does not gloss over the cruelty of slavery and racism, the land grabs and industrialisation of the capitalists. Equally he is equally as critical of ruthless dictators. Basically a book like this could be politically neutral (if such a think exists) but I think Berry chooses to describe the history and political periods with his own voice, warts and all. One thing that comes through in all his books is that he is a decent guy and someone I would love to have a drink with!The less interesting chapters for me where the later ones where jet flight enabled wealthy Americans and then Europeans to descend on the Caribbean and wave after wave of hotels sprung up. You do sense it would be hard to get an actual decent drink in some of them. However, in this sense it is part travel guide and captures the early burgeoning tourist industry in the Caribbean.So what of the drinks? I have to be honest I have not tried any of the recipes. I'm currently not drinking but I can say that from previous recipes in books they will be spot on, and even if they are not what he tries to do is be authentic (even if the results are not the best!). I just loved his opinions on pina coladas and their variations. Yep, I'm not a fan of them either. I love his diligence in identifying the correct ingredients, even if they are lost and his attempts to recreate them using alternatives.So mix a mai tai (still my favourite cocktail even though the recipe I use isn't the original one) and raise a glass. Not just to Berry and the wonderful people who put the book together but the drinkers, bartenders and ordinary people who created this history.Highly recommended.

  • Dan
    2019-02-20 07:19

    Fascinating history of the drinks of the Caribbean and the people who made them. I made a few of them and DAMN were they tasty, and deceptively easy to drink!Do yourself and your bar a favor, and read this book. Great pictures will enthrall you and easy instructions will have you slingin' dranks like it is your job.

  • Ryanagate
    2019-03-16 06:43

    Sweet book. Lots of history!

  • Robert
    2019-03-17 02:43

    An entertaining blend of history and mixology.

  • Mike Noyes
    2019-02-23 08:32

    A great history book. So much wonderful information about these great drinks, where they came from and the geniuses who concocted them.

  • Katia
    2019-02-25 04:41

    Great read as usual, because the author makes the cocktails seem like archaeology. Can't wait for our next tiki party.