Read A Short History of Renaissance Europe: Dances Over Fire and Water by Jonathan W. Zophy Online

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This concise survey is designed to make the exciting history of Europe in the age of the Renaissance and Reformation come alive to readers. It is the first textbook on Europe between 1300 and 1700 to focus on gender as a significant issue for historical analysis. Author Jonathan W. Zophy introduces major events and personalities of the period as well as its cultural, econoThis concise survey is designed to make the exciting history of Europe in the age of the Renaissance and Reformation come alive to readers. It is the first textbook on Europe between 1300 and 1700 to focus on gender as a significant issue for historical analysis. Author Jonathan W. Zophy introduces major events and personalities of the period as well as its cultural, economic, religious, political, and social developments. Taking a biographical approach, the book discusses ideas and artistic creations in their human and societal contexts. Reflects the latest in cross-disciplinary scholarship Written in a lively, student-friendly style Handsomely illustrated with masterpieces of art and useful maps Each chapter concludes with a chronology and up-to-date reading lists NEW—Revised bibliographies NEW—Additional material on Savonarola and Philip Melanchthon ...

Title : A Short History of Renaissance Europe: Dances Over Fire and Water
Author :
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ISBN : 9780133204339
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 317 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

A Short History of Renaissance Europe: Dances Over Fire and Water Reviews

  • Karen
    2018-10-08 15:34

    This was billed as an undergraduate textbook, which we’re using in a graduate class for background info. While the basics of “who, what, where, when” are in the book, there was way too much moralizing and sweeping statements for which the author did not provide any substantiation.For instance, in chapter one he wrote, "Almost every adult had poor teeth and fetid breath." What was the foundation of this ridiculous assertion? The author provides no proof, and frankly, I think this is one of those things that you could never prove one way or the other. It’s a blatantly ridiculous statement that he expects the reader to take at face value.On the same page there is an illustration of a ploughman. The caption tells us that it is an image of a man who was "obliged to work in order to live." I’m not sure where the author/editor was going with that statement, but the implication seems to be that we should feel sorry for this guy from the past because he actually had to break a sweat and earn a living. Perhaps it’s news to someone in academia, but for most of humanity, past and present, working to earn a living is not anything new.By the time I reached chapter ten on Martin Luther's Revolt, I finally had enough of the silliness and sweeping statements and just shelved the book. Here’s what set me off: Did you know Luther's father worked a copper mine that "contributed to problems of deforestation and pollution"?I really thought this had no place in the material, both because it’s (AGAIN) making a sweeping generalization based on assumptions, and because of the implicit politics and moralizing contained within the text. Unless we know the copper mine destroyed the environment and that’s what set Luther off, then this has no place in the text. At all.Regardless of what Mr. Zophy's personal politics are, I grow weary of writers who use the pages of their books to offer up their own politics – unless, of course, the book IS about politics or an autobiography. For textbooks, please stick to the subject and don’t introduce material unless it is actually relevant or unless you have sound reasons for including it. Otherwise, write an opinion piece for publication somewhere else.I still want proof of that fetid breath.

  • Kaitlyn
    2018-09-29 17:33

    This was the "textbook" used in a history class on the Renaissance and Reformation I just took; however, it isn't a very big book, so I have a hard time calling it a "textbook." Zophy wrote a good book-- the chapters are logically divided, so it's easy to read the history of the time period all the way through, or just find one area to read up on if that's what you need. He provides detail on many different people, locations, events, etc. of the time period in a way that makes me think of encyclopedia entries-- so it's really easy to find info and then digest it. His writing style is great too-- it's easy to read and comprehend, to-the-point, with the perfect amount of information for a quick overview and is interesting too. It's a great little read.He also includes convenient bibliographies at the end of each chapter. So if you want to get a introduction to a topic, you can read up on it in his book, and then flip to the end of the chapter to see if there's other sources mentioned on the topic, and then do further reading on it. Very helpful!This would make a great reference book to keep on hand too! Zophy did a good job with this book! I wish he wrote on the "textbooks" for all my classes! :)

  • Holly
    2018-10-03 12:14

    This book was extremely readable, and very concise without seeming so. The writing style is crystal clear and flows nicely through the centuries by stopping on personalities who were pivotal in the historical events related in this text. Most important it set the reformation stage wonderfully and fairly without seeming to attack either side. This read coupled with lecture (but not necessary) significantly enhanced my working knowledge of reformation history.

  • StrangeBedfellows
    2018-10-17 10:18

    Definitely, this is a short history. The time frame covered by this text is a pivotal one in European history, yet Zophy breezes over the material. Granted, that made it easier to memorize the text on the night before exams, but for actually learning the history of this period, it wasn't a good book.

  • Victoria
    2018-10-07 17:33

    This book is terrible. Full of typos (Giogio Vasari; Corpus Christy; etc.), factual errors, and unforgivable leaps of logic and lapses in analysis. It's because of textbooks like this that students come away from courses on the Ren & Ref without any real understanding of the historical causality. Or how to spell.

  • Daniel Adorno
    2018-10-10 10:34

    As an Ancient and Medieval history major, this book is invaluable to me. It gives a concise survey of Medieval and Reformation Europe without getting stuffy and lofty. A must-have for the Medieval scholar.

  • Marie
    2018-10-11 16:41

    used as a textbook for my Renaissance & Reformation class in college

  • Matthew Barlow
    2018-10-15 09:21

    Standard textbook. Fullnof information but not a casual read book.

  • Jacob
    2018-10-14 16:22

    Meh

  • Abraham
    2018-09-20 16:39

    A very good introductory text to the European Renaissance and Reformation.

  • Sean Chick
    2018-10-04 17:14

    Zophy's prose and organization seems scatter-shot. Not a good book for beginners but I like that he does not ignore the role of personality in history or fail to pepper his work with anecdotes.