Read The Cut of Men's Clothes: 1600-1900 by Norah Waugh Online

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This book traces the evolution of the style of men's dress through a sequence of diagrams accurately scaled down from patterns of actual garments, many of them rare museum specimens. The plates have been selected with the same purpose. Some are photographs of suits for which diagrams have also been given; others, reproduced from paintings and old prints, show the costume cThis book traces the evolution of the style of men's dress through a sequence of diagrams accurately scaled down from patterns of actual garments, many of them rare museum specimens. The plates have been selected with the same purpose. Some are photographs of suits for which diagrams have also been given; others, reproduced from paintings and old prints, show the costume complete with its accessories. Quotations from contemporary sources--from diaries, travelers' accounts and tailors' bills--supplement Norah Waugh's text with comments on fashion and lively eyewitness descriptions....

Title : The Cut of Men's Clothes: 1600-1900
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780878300259
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 194 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Cut of Men's Clothes: 1600-1900 Reviews

  • Gonnamakeit
    2018-11-17 12:00

    Interesting book on the various ways clothes were cut between 1600-1900. Lots of cut examples are provided from each period and for each style. I especially loved the contemporary quotes from various sources. I would have liked more pictures of the various garments as the author went along to help me visualize them, but this was mostly solved by using google.

  • Meg Powers
    2018-10-18 16:12

    I wish there were a few more pictures in here, but this is an otherwise excellent resource. The book includes fashion plates and patterns, descriptions of clothing cuts and details, and quotes from each century's fashion contemporaries.

  • Jesus
    2018-10-20 13:28

    Men wore corsets?! Ah, the fragile beauty of the Victorian consumptive figure...fashion.