Read John Glenn: America's Astronaut by Andrew Chaikin Online

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In February 1962, he became the first American to orbit the Earth. Since then John Herschel Glenn Jr. has stood in the popular imagination as a quintessentially American hero. In John Glenn:  America's Astronaut, a special edition e-book featuring 45 stunning photographs as well as a video, Chaikin explores Glenn's path to greatness.  John Glenn features new details on GleIn February 1962, he became the first American to orbit the Earth. Since then John Herschel Glenn Jr. has stood in the popular imagination as a quintessentially American hero. In John Glenn:  America's Astronaut, a special edition e-book featuring 45 stunning photographs as well as a video, Chaikin explores Glenn's path to greatness.  John Glenn features new details on Glenn's selection as an astronaut in 1959, newly synchronized onboard film and audio of Glenn's harrowing reentry from orbit on his 1962 Mercury mission, rarely seen images of Glenn in orbit and from the John Glenn archives at Ohio State University, as well as new, touching reminiscenes of Glenn's 1998 return to space from his Space Shuttle crewmates. Glenn is the embodiment of the history of human spaceflight and the indefatigable American spirit, and John Glenn:  America's Astronaut is his amazing story....

Title : John Glenn: America's Astronaut
Author :
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ISBN : 9781588344861
Format Type : ebook
Number of Pages : 80 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

John Glenn: America's Astronaut Reviews

  • Richard Buro
    2018-10-13 01:11

    The short version first . . . There are firsts about which we all have some knowledge, hopefully. One that might not be in your immediate recall list is the first American to orbit the Earth. In elementary school, I learned about things like this during “Show and Tell” or “Week in Review.” Regardless, if you are into the aerospace scene, as I usually am, the first American to orbit the Earth passed away this week. That intrepid aviator was none other than John Herschel Glenn, Jr. Most of us in the 1960s and interested in the relatively new National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) knew his name well as one of the premier members of the Project Mercury Seven, the astronauts chosen to make the first ventures into the realms of outer space, starting just a bit over 100 miles above surface of our “pale blue dot” (the late Dr. Carl Sagan). John Glenn was, in fact, probably one of the most intrepid airmen of them all. Mr. Glenn, at the age of 95, passed away this week (December 8, 2016). In a publication by the Smithsonian Institute,Andrew Chaikin provided a brief (70 page), enhanced (with several photographs and 2 videos) biography, entitledJohn Glenn: America’s Astronaut , a truly outstanding American, a Marine aviator and test pilot, a veteran of World War II, the Korean Conflict, Project Bullet, and the first American 7, Mercury Atlas Astronauts. He was married to Annie Castor in April, 1942. They had two children, John David, and Lyn. Annie and the children survive their husband and father. In this biography,Mr. Chaikin looked at Glenn’s life from New Concord, Ohio, through private flying after college and later Marine training, seeing combat in World War II in the Pacific Theater and in the Korean Conflict, to test pilot training at Patuxent River, MD where he participated in Project Bullet, a program designed to find out who could fly the fastest over a pre-determined non-stop transcontinental route. Glenn did so breaking the record by 23 minutes and 74 miles per hour faster than the previous record.Mr. Chaikin provides detailed treatment of Major Glenn’s early experience with the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) which focused on piloted space vehicles where test pilots were needed. Glenn requested assignment to participate in the study, and he was accepted. He also was in position to move to the re-designation of the NACA to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). He competed for and was accepted to the first classes of seven astronauts to pilot space craft in NASA’s Project Mercury. Included in this section of the book is a video mashup of original 16mm film footage from the camera in Glenn’s spacecraft while making its maneuvers to leave orbit and land safely in the Atlantic Ocean.Mr. Chaikin worked with the project by adding an audio blend of original taped conversations between Glenn and the group during the entire process. Detail was exceptional, and even a person with skill at doing these types of mashups would be pleasantly astounded at the quality of result. The book also contains a similar type of video presentation based on Glenn’s last space flight about Shuttle Discovery where he became the oldest human to ever fly in space, as the 7th member of the STS-95 crew. His narration of the images projected on the screen is humorous and factual, and it is presented in the same, smiling voice that characterized Glenn all through his life. The last sentence of the book is a fitting tribute to Mr. Glenn as a summation of his exploits and deeds, coming from Steve Robinson, another member of the STS-95 flight crew who said of Glenn, “I ended up thinking the John Glenn isn’t a great person because of what he accomplished in life, it’s the other way around. He’s accomplished these amazing things in life because he’s a great human being.” Would that we could all share that accomplishment in our own lives!Recommendations:This is a 5 out of 5 star read, certainly. It is short by some benchmarks, but as a synopsis of a full life, it hits the mark. Even a slow reader like me was able to navigate the book including the videos (which I really enjoyed) in an easy half-day, and believe me, that is a fast read for me. The topic is fit for all readers of any age where the only drawback to ages able to read might be the vocabulary. The book is certainly worthy of being included in any school’s library from mid-elementary through high school. Even (and especially) adults will find many things to appreciate about the writer and his subject. It is an elegant, simple read about a true American icon. Scott Carpenter, one of the Mercury seven said, “Godspeed. John Glenn,” as Glenn lifted off on the Friendship 7 mission in Project Mercury. A more fitting sendoff, there never was, is, or ever shall be. May Godspeed us all on every journey we attempt no matter how long or how far.Review of Andrew Chaikin's John Glenn: America's Astronaut by Richard Buro is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.Based on a work at https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/22439964-john-glenn.Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at http://www.penguin.com/subrights/.

  • Heather Goss
    2018-09-25 05:13

    The disclaimer of all disclaimers, short of being the author: My magazine, Air & Space, commissioned and published this e-book. (Though I didn't work on it personally.)Andy Chaikin is an extremely talented space historian, and he shows it off here. This is a both a fairly comprehensive look at John Glenn's life--from his childhood to his retirement (this was published 2 years before his death)--and yet is a quick read at only 80 pages. If you'd like just a bit more glimpse into the life of this impressive aviator, astronaut, and generally kind and descent human being, definitely pick this up. The Kindle also includes lots of photos, which appeared fine on my old school b&w device, and 2-3 videos, which did not work on mine but should display properly on a Kindle Fire.