Read Super-Villains Unite: The Complete Super-Villain Team-Up by Roy Thomas Tony Isabella Jim Shooter Bill Mantlo John Buscema Mike Sekowsky George Evans Sal Buscema Online

super-villains-unite-the-complete-super-villain-team-up

The Lord of Latveria and Atlantis' Avenging Son forge the Marvel Universe's most volatile alliance! But when the Sub-Mariner regrets his decision, he finds it's not that easy to walk away from a pact with Doom. Can anything get him out of this torturous team-up? Maybe the Fantastic Four...but probably not the Avengers, who've been enslaved by Attuma! And while Dr. Doom hasThe Lord of Latveria and Atlantis' Avenging Son forge the Marvel Universe's most volatile alliance! But when the Sub-Mariner regrets his decision, he finds it's not that easy to walk away from a pact with Doom. Can anything get him out of this torturous team-up? Maybe the Fantastic Four...but probably not the Avengers, who've been enslaved by Attuma! And while Dr. Doom has his gauntlets full keeping Namor in line, the Red Skull sets his sights on Latveria! When Captain America sides with Doom, you know you're in trouble. But both Doom and the Skull plan to enslave the Earth...and the only ones standing in their way are Magneto and the Champions! Introducing the Shroud, and featuring the villainy of the Hate-Monger! COLLECTING: GIANT-SIZE SUPER-VILLAIN TEAMUP 1-2; SUPER-VILLAIN TEAM-UP 1-14, 16-17; AVENGERS 154-156; CHAMPIONS 16...

Title : Super-Villains Unite: The Complete Super-Villain Team-Up
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780785194064
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 464 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Super-Villains Unite: The Complete Super-Villain Team-Up Reviews

  • Stephen Snyder
    2019-01-27 01:09

    Marvel's megalomaniacs' maniacal mayhem must- read! Nuff Said!

  • Shannon Appelcline
    2019-01-30 01:06

    Roy Thomas (GS 1+2) largely offers a two-issue argument as Doom and Namor try to convince each other to work together. I actually liked the first issue (which was a frame for reprints) better than the second. That was because the reprints (Submariner #20 and some issue of FF) were nicely constructed tales. In contrast #2 was simultaneously overly stretched to fit the longer length of the Giant-Size issue and overly abrupt in getting to its main story of an android rebellion [5/10].Early Days (1-4). Four issues with three authors doesn't bode well, but the first three actually read quite well. Tony Isabella continues plots from the cancelled Sub-Mariner comic, then Jim Shooter finishes it off nicely. There are some good moments of pathos and shock that both draw us toward and away from our villains [6+/10]. Unfortunately Bill Mantlo caps things with a fourth issue where Doc Doom and Namor decide to fight and break up. Again. There's something about Deathlok that makes little sense without context, and overall the issue is a bore [3/10].Steve Englehart (5-8). Englehart really changes the feel of this comic. Before it was what it's name promised: a super-villain teamup. As such, it was a very unique book. Here, the Fantasy Four tread heavily in the pages, and the book falls into the more comfortable hero-villain dynamic of most of Marvel's comics. Still, there are some nice elements, particularly the intro of the Shroud (at least, he's nice if he's intended to be hilarious camp, and I think he is). Meanwhile, Englehart returns to classic elements of Hydro Base and the Hydro people, and it's nice to see those plots advance [6/10].The Avengers (9 + A154-156). Another four issues with three authors: Gerry Conway, Jim Shooter, and the new SVTU author, Bill Mantlo. Clearly, this continues the superheroification of SVTU, but it's not a bad story, as the Avengers stumble into a conflict between Doc Doom, Subby, and Atuma that none of them understand ... which is sort of delightful. The last issue by Shooter is weaker than the Conway or Mantlo issues and focuses on lots of punching, but there's fun deviousness before that [6/10].The Red Skull (10-12). Bill Mantlo's first solo work on SVTU is ... unfortunately not very inspiring. It's great to have a new villain, as the Doom + Subby dynamic was getting dull. But this story is a pretty dull fight with Cap, Doom, and Shroud facing off against the Red Skull. I think the boringness of Mantlo's Skull really says it all: he's not able to take advantage of the interesting characterization introduced in Englehart's short reign [4/10].Finale! (13). The final team-up between Doom & Sub-Mariner is nice mainly because it ties up plot threads going back years. The story itself is largely pedestrian fighting [6/10].Magneto (14 + Champions). Sadly, these issues show how SVTU really lost its way. They're all about Magneto facing off against Doom in a totally normal hero-versus-villain way, and they also inundate the comic with yet more heroes like the Avengers and Champions. Worse, it's a pretty meh story after all that [3/10].Nazis (16-17). These last issues by Peter Gillis tend to recover what SVTU lost. They're about villains interacting with villains and living in their own ecosystem. It's great to see a truly repugnant Red Skull and the unveiling of the Hate Monger. There are times when the storytelling is clumsy and the pacing feels off, but I'll forgive that for the unusual sort of story that Gillis was telling [7/10].Overall, Super-Villain Team-Up never fulfilled its promise. There were times when it stood out as something truly unique, but then the Avengers or the Champions or the Fantastic Four blundered in and turned it back into a much more traditional title. In addition, the revolving door of creative teams constantly muddled the plots, often moving major plotlines off to the periphery for no good reason. The loss of the Shroud + Doom plotline mid-book is the most obvious, but it was an ongoing problem. This collection was interesting to read as a piece of historical ephemera, but it probably won't remain in my library.

  • Brent
    2019-02-05 21:17

    More super-villain fights and 1970s talents in a mishmash of good and bad in the Marvel universe.I bought every issue of this title, first on newsstand, and then from my local comics shop, still doing business.Rereading, it was as subject to staffing and vision change as anything at 1970s Marvel.To me, highlights are Steve Englehart's run featuring new superhero The Shroud and Peter Gillis's two issue coda, featuring Nazi super villains vs. Israelis and SHIELD.As part of Englehart's run, Dr. Doom signs a nonaggression pact with Henry Kissinger, US Secretary of State to 1976.Too many team-ups and crossovers ruin Bill Mantlo's work here. But, you know, if you missed these, here they are...