Read The Science And Politics Of Global Climate Change: A Guide To The Debate by Andrew E. Dessler Edward A. Parson Online

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Climate variability has become the primary environmental concern of the 21st Century. Yet, despite the scientific community's warnings of the imminent dangers of global warming, politicians world-wide have failed to agree on what to do about this potentially devastating environmental problem. This introductory primer informs scientists, policy makers and the general publicClimate variability has become the primary environmental concern of the 21st Century. Yet, despite the scientific community's warnings of the imminent dangers of global warming, politicians world-wide have failed to agree on what to do about this potentially devastating environmental problem. This introductory primer informs scientists, policy makers and the general public by clarifying the conflicting claims of the debate....

Title : The Science And Politics Of Global Climate Change: A Guide To The Debate
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ISBN : 9780521831703
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 190 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Science And Politics Of Global Climate Change: A Guide To The Debate Reviews

  • Anthony
    2019-03-19 03:35

    A highly readable introduction to (predictably) the science and politics behind climate change, Dessler and Parson present a comprehensive overview of the issue's contours and significance. Written before the IPCC released their Fourth Assessment Report, and therefore lacking a degree of currency enjoyed by more recent publications, their book covers the terrain of climate skepticism, risk assessment, the state of international cooperation (pre-COP15), and theories of science. If you're looking to gain a deep insight into the anticipated impacts of climate change or an assessment of current mitigation options, this would not be the preferred source. Instead, check out reports published by Resources for the Future, the World Resources Institute, or the Kennedy School's Belfer Center. Still, for covering less than 200 pages, I would highly recommend this to anyone seeking a standalone, intelligent primer on the issue that will most gravely challenge this century's policymakers.

  • Daniel
    2019-02-27 19:43

    Now this book is a decent introduction into the state of scientific knowledge about climate trends as well as the politics surrounding the issue. It is a sober, non-shrill discussion of what we think we know, how we know it, and what we might expect in the future. I have one serious complaint. At one point the authors reproduce the ever popular graph that shows C02 levels and temperature trending together over the last several hundred thousand years. The authors point out that it is "likely" that the temperature rises happened first and caused C02 increases, and then they add that such an observation does not "refute" the claim that rising CO2 could cause temp increases. True, it doesn't refute it, but it would mean that those graphs showing C02 and Temp running together through history are COMPLETELY IRRELEVANT to the claim that increases in CO2 cause temp increases. Note that I am not saying that the causality cannot run in both directions, but basic logic tells us that A causes B is not evidence in any way whatsoever that B causes A. It does not serve the ends of those concerned well when they use bogus arguments to convince us; furthermore, I would have liked to have seen a discussion of the scientific evidence that the mechanism of temp increases of late are CO2 increases. The argument in this book is basically that the other known causes of climate change are unlikely, but to those of us who are not scientists it is not clear how strong the belief is that it is CO2 (along with water vapor) that keeps the sun's rays hugging the earth.