Read The Jane Austen Marriage Manual by Helen Amy Online

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How was Elizabeth Bennett expected to respond to Mr Darcy’s gauche advances? How was a mother meant to present her daughter to society for the first time? It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man, even these days (if reasonably educated), recognises the beginning of that quotation! A strict code of conduct governed courtship and marriage in Regency EnglandHow was Elizabeth Bennett expected to respond to Mr Darcy’s gauche advances? How was a mother meant to present her daughter to society for the first time? It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man, even these days (if reasonably educated), recognises the beginning of that quotation! A strict code of conduct governed courtship and marriage in Regency England during the period in which Jane Austen’s novels were set, broadly 1796 to 1816. Young, genteel women had to learn and adhere to these rules. What was a girl to do? How should a mother direct her eligible (or not so eligible) daughter? Many turned to the etiquette manuals made available by a burgeoning publishing industry. Published to coincide with the bicentenary of the death of Jane Austen, The Jane Austen Marriage Manual draws from this pool of early ‘how-to’ popular literature, read by Jane and her contemporaries (and actually referred to in her novels), as well as Jane’s own experiences. It traces the many stages of courtship and its potential pitfalls, from a girl’s first entry into society through to her wedding day and beyond....

Title : The Jane Austen Marriage Manual
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ISBN : 9781445651729
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 288 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Jane Austen Marriage Manual Reviews

  • Pippa
    2018-12-06 11:24

    This book was a little bit of a disappointment for me, because I mistakenly thought it was a reference material that drew from period texts, not just a collection of the period texts themselves. Some of the earlier ones were particularly difficult to work through, given the evolution in language that has occurred since the 1600s.That said, it was a very interesting book to read, once I'd gotten over my disappointment. It was an interesting experience to read something written in, for example, 1695 and feel that it resonates and still has relevance today. It was hilarious to read things like "You are to consider, That men who say Extream fine Things, many times say them most for their own Sakes" and go 'Oh, I know a guy like that!'; and "Avoid, both before and after marriage, all thoughts of managing your husband". That's solid advice, today as it was in the 1700s, and I've heard similar pieces of advice doled out by women I know.The essays written by men left a very different impression with me. Mostly, they were just a series of contradictory statements and admonitions that everything that could possibly go wrong was ultimately was the fault of the woman. Don't smile, don't be serious, don't be nice, don't be mean, don't accept anyone with good manners, don't accept anyone with bad manners, love is a lie, don't marry a man you don't love, etc. One letter in particular, by Jonathan Swift to a family friend he apparently thought very highly of, included a line where he told her he "cannot conceive you to be Human Creatures, but a sort of Species hardly a degree above a Monkey". I really hope the lady he was writing to ignored every last word he ever said to her.I wouldn't recommend this book to anyone who isn't specifically looking for examples of period literature on this topic, or one of the essays specifically contained. I'll keep it in case I ever need to consult it, but I doubt I'll read it again.