Read How the Establishment Lost Control by Chris Nineham Online

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The post-war consensus is breaking up. The 2014 Scottish referendum, the election of Jeremy Corbyn as Labour leader and the turmoil of the EU referendum all testify to an insurgent mood amongst swathes of the population. This book will attempt to explain these dramatic developments and to show how they question received notions about politics, history and how change happenThe post-war consensus is breaking up. The 2014 Scottish referendum, the election of Jeremy Corbyn as Labour leader and the turmoil of the EU referendum all testify to an insurgent mood amongst swathes of the population. This book will attempt to explain these dramatic developments and to show how they question received notions about politics, history and how change happens. Above all they challenge widespread assumptions about the resilience of elite hegemony, the influence of conventional structures of thought and the ability of the mass of the population to think autonomously in a 'post-ideological age'....

Title : How the Establishment Lost Control
Author :
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ISBN : 9781785356315
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 181 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

How the Establishment Lost Control Reviews

  • Rebecca Farren
    2019-04-17 01:08

    6/10How the Establishment Lost Control charts the events that led to Labour's unexpected election success and the Brexit vote, tries to explain how and why it happened and offers an argument as to how the left move forward if they want to continue the momentum (no pun intended!) Overall it does this well. If you want a (very) left-wing overview of how we got to where we are then this book is worth a read.The first half of the book gives a whistle-stop tour of the changes in the political landscape from the early 1970s to now in an attempt to explain Corbyn's success. I am fully on board with most of the arguments presented here (I joined Labour first as a supporter and then as a member and voted for Corbyn in both leadership elections). However, it tries to cram loads of different points into a very short space- the whole book is just over one hundred pages- so what you get is lots of very strongly worded opinion statements, granted with equally as many stats and references to back them up, but with not much analysis. There isn't really any nuanced discussion before the author jumps on to the next point so it moves too quickly. It is easy to gloss over the numbers and at times It feels as though the author making brash, unjustified claims their even though the evidence is there, so as a reader I felt underwhelmed and even disconcerted at times. It was strange to read something I knew I agreed with but didn't quite feel comfortable with because of the way it was presented. The second half of the book is much more analytical and rectifies the problem of the earlier chapters. However, Chapter 4 moves straight from fast-paced description to full-on analysis, using the Marxist theory of class consciousness explain our current situation. There's not really a bridge between the two and it was a bit of a strange leap. I certainly wasn't expecting it and I imagine it would feel even stranger if you've never studied Marx before! I am in agreement with the author, however, and I think the theory is well explained and accessible. The last two chapters are by far the best, striking the right balance between description and analysis. The argument in the last chapter is strong, to the point and well developed, ending the book on a high.This is not the best political book I've ever read by far, but if you want a short left-wing account of how Corbyn defied his critics and some inspiration for what to do next, and you don't mind a bit of Marxism, then this book is a good option.

  • Brendan Crowley
    2019-04-12 23:10

    (I received a free copy via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review)The book is at its best when it sticks to the title and examines why their has been a populist movement and why the "elites" didn't see it coming. The capture of the system is what is interesting here in the absence of a proper answer as to how to fix things other than "Jez We Can". However, the author loses interest in this angle and it becomes a pro-Corbyn pro-street protest polemic and call to arms. Parts of it read like a post grad Marxist studies thesis mixed with political propaganda for "Corbynism". The key failure is that it criticises capitalism primarily for failure to deliver high levels of growth and investment while proposing (the rough outline) of a system which would result in no growth and no investment. Its very light on detail on what Corbyn would replace capitalism with? It mentions nationalise the utilities, more welfare and more progressive taxation - a situation Ireland has been in for years and we are hardly a socialist paradise so i suspect a lot more is needed if reform is really going to be radical. The other key failure is its endorsement of the hard left case for Brexit - the EU does limit State Aid but does not stop state run industries competing with private sector and does not stop grants to citizens to pay for State provided services. SO its very possible to nationalise utilities without leaving the EU. It also misses the key point that without the EU, the Tories have a lot more reign to lower regulations, employment standards etc. Post-Brexit Tory Britain will be a lot grimmer than pre-Brexit. The author makes bold declarations about where the British public stands. However, it misses or downplays two key points - 1) more people in 2017 voted for the Tories and 2) way more people voted for establishment MPs including many people who voted Labour despite, and not because of Corbyn.The author is clearly very bright, well read and a person with their heart very much in the right place. It captures well the failures of neoliberalism, the success of protest movement and the general desire for change. Its failure to objectively consider the recent election (e.g. many voted against May rather than for Corbyn) outside of a Corbmania viewpoint is its biggest let down. .

  • Hannah
    2019-04-24 01:59

    (I received a free copy from Net Gallery in exchange for an honest review.)A great read about the current moment in the Left -- it's specifically about the Left in the U.K., but a lot of the observations are easily applicable to the US. There's a lot of stuff I'm definitely gonna take to heart with my own political organizing.