Read Talk, Talk : A Children's Book Author Speaks to Grown-Ups by E.L. Konigsburg Online

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In TalkTalk E. L. Konigsburg presents a selection of speeches she has given over a period of 25 years. In her introduction to the first speech, and to the book as a whole, she explains: "While each of my books has been written because I had a story I wanted to tell, these speeches were written because I had something I wanted to say. The audience for the former is childrenIn TalkTalk E. L. Konigsburg presents a selection of speeches she has given over a period of 25 years. In her introduction to the first speech, and to the book as a whole, she explains: "While each of my books has been written because I had a story I wanted to tell, these speeches were written because I had something I wanted to say. The audience for the former is children; for the latter, adults.... I recognize -- with a measure of amused detachment -- that some were written as a reaction to trends; others, to fads. I have given these talks in cafetoriums, auditoriums, and the public rooms of Holiday Inns. Even though I have not always been on a stage when addressing an audience, I have tried to set the stage. Between talk and talk, I have written passages connecting the speeches to the time in which they were written and to one another. And that is TalkTalk." Always a thought-provoking speaker, she has chosen nine speeches that capture the essence of her years as a writer for children. When brought together, they enrich one another and provide a chance to look back at what children's books have been, to observe where they are now and to offer an insightful look at what books may continue to mean to children in the years to come. Written by an outstanding author, these speeches, individually and together, represent a vision of the need for books and the role books have played and should continue to play in the lives of children....

Title : Talk, Talk : A Children's Book Author Speaks to Grown-Ups
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780689319938
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 192 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Talk, Talk : A Children's Book Author Speaks to Grown-Ups Reviews

  • Claire
    2018-11-04 22:42

    First, let me say that this book was very hard to find. My copy was actually a "reference book" from a library that looks like it was never even opened. I was intrigued to read it, since I really enjoy many of E.L. Konigsburg's books. This was a compilation of speeches she had written with introductions and commentaries before each one. The main point Konigsburg tries to get across is the importance of books in the lives of young children. This book was written in 1995, so I'm sure Konigsburg would be even more worried about the future of out children in today's world. I was very interested in reading about how the publication of children's books has evolved in her lifetime. I really enjoyed this book and enjoyed the feisty voice that Konigsburg has.

  • Ellice
    2018-10-24 03:49

    I was hoping for a lot out of these speeches, as Konigsburg was the author of some of my favorite books as a child, including From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler and Jennifer, Hecate, Macbeth, William McKinley and Me, Elizabeth. She's also one of the few authors I have ever written a fan letter to, and one of the even smaller crew who wrote back. These speeches she gave over several decades are interesting and insightful, but seem a bit dated in their approach--not surprising as the book was published in 1995, but it's hard to think today about the main threat to children reading books being television. Still, there is lots here to make one think, and some of her points have sparked other ideas in me that I hope to follow up on later. Worth a read if you are a big fan of hers.

  • Desertisland
    2018-11-12 03:09

    Recent remark I read from someone bringing a 21st century viewpoint critizing an early 20th century work of art (come to think of it, complaining that a character living 100 years ago didn't have the same attitude as she does today...) made me note Konigsburg's comments (in this collection of essays and speeches) about politically correctness wanting to change words in classic literature:"Don't the politically correct understand that what the unrewritten classics have to offer is what the naked David (Michaelangelo's sculpture that some put figleaves on) has to offer: a record of how a civilization felt about itself at a given time." (pages 166-7)Re the "n-word" in Huckleberry Finn leading some school to remove the book from required reading list: "Nigger is a dinosaur of a word, of a thought. But suppressing books that tell about them will not alter the past". (page 54)

  • Pam
    2018-11-17 00:42

    Who didn't love From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler? Written by the same author, these are Konigsburg's speeches from the late 60s through the 90s. With some interesting wisdom and insight about reading, learning, children, and writing, I thoroughly enjoyed this read.

  • Becca
    2018-11-04 00:08

    Ms. Koningsburg seems like that terrifying and superlative English teacher whose every compliment and correction you'd commit to memory. She is dated but a pioneer, a fantastic thinker and a wonderful storyteller-- even in these talks. They are arranged chronologically and cover a heap of topics: children's literature, the middle ages, science, the creative process-- a really nourishing read. Especially excellent for teachers, writers, librarians and lovers of children's literature.

  • Melissa
    2018-11-16 02:54

    A collection of talks given by Kongisburg dating from her Newbery acceptance speech into the 1990s. Enjoyable and insightful as to her preoccupations as a writer and mother, but nothing earth-shattering.