Read Releasing the Imagination: Essays on Education, the Arts, and Social Change by Maxine Greene Online

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It is imagination, says Maxine Greene, that opens our eyes to worlds beyond our experience - enabling us to create, care for others, and envision social change. In "Releasing the Imagination," this renowned educator and philosopher reveals the critical role of imagination in cognitive and other modes of learning. Ruminating on themes such as literacy, the arts and aesthetiIt is imagination, says Maxine Greene, that opens our eyes to worlds beyond our experience - enabling us to create, care for others, and envision social change. In "Releasing the Imagination," this renowned educator and philosopher reveals the critical role of imagination in cognitive and other modes of learning. Ruminating on themes such as literacy, the arts and aesthetics, pluralism, multiculturalism, and the tensions and passions of caring, Greene carefully considers both the realities of hard economic times and the human requirement for expressiveness....

Title : Releasing the Imagination: Essays on Education, the Arts, and Social Change
Author :
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ISBN : 9780787952914
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 236 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Releasing the Imagination: Essays on Education, the Arts, and Social Change Reviews

  • Kelsey
    2019-03-27 12:03

    There are some great strengths in this book, and some great weaknesses--in my opinion. The biggest thing that drove me crazy was the author's extensive reliance on literary sources. I hadn't read any of the books she was referring to and thus those references made no sense to me. Her reference list at the end is super long, and most of them aren't scholarly research articles. They're novels, poems, etc. that she quotes in support of her arguments. Only, I can't tell how well the passages show her argument because they're out of context for me.That said, she does makes perceptive statements about the nature of education, the arts and social change. (It's fairly clear where she stands in politics, which is a little annoying. I think you can be a good teacher whether you lean one way or the other.) The first three chapters/essays in particular were really thought-provoking.Overall, I think it was worth my time to read this, but I wish I'd been familiar with the literary sources she constantly quotes and discusses. I feel like I missed a big piece of the picture.

  •  Jackie
    2019-04-10 07:55

    Maxine Greene is a true visionary in the highest sense. Her essays contained in Releasing the Imagination encourage the reader to think outside the box, to challenge their own ideas, and furthermore to become the teacher that truly changes the lives of her students. I am inspired by Greene and encourage anyone who wants to think in a new way to read her.

  • Melissa
    2019-04-06 04:05

    Students didn't like this book as much as I did when I taught it this summer. Theory interspersed with literature, poetry, fictional characters, musings about art, and the importance of aesthetic experiences in education. A worthwhile book.

  • Erin
    2019-04-01 12:17

    To say that I "read" this is a lie. I skimmed most of it. It was painful. After 200 pages, the message is this: use your imagination. DUH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! What a waste of time.

  • sam howie
    2019-03-24 03:53

    'As we ponder educational purposes, we might take into account the possibility that the main point of education (in the context of a lived life) is to enable a human being to become increasingly mindful with regard to his or her lived situation - and its untapped possibilities' (p. 182).

  • Sara Cochran
    2019-04-18 07:53

    Reading this and another Maxine Greene book during my graduate work in education almost sent me away from education. I agree with so much that she says and feel so helpless in the machine. I may revisit this reading someday.

  • Derek Fenner
    2019-03-22 05:01

    A classic book for arts-education which borrows from phenomenological philosophy & heralds the arts as a vehicle for social change in education.