Read The Selected Poems by Tao Yuanming David Hinton Online

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Poetry. THE SELECTED POEMS OF TAO CHIN brings into English some of the most important poetry in all of Chinese literature. As David Hinton writes in his introduction, Tao Chien "stands at the head of the great Chinese tradition like a revered grandfather: profoundly wise, self-possessed, quiet, comforting." Tao was the first writer to make a poetry of his natural voice andPoetry. THE SELECTED POEMS OF TAO CHIN brings into English some of the most important poetry in all of Chinese literature. As David Hinton writes in his introduction, Tao Chien "stands at the head of the great Chinese tradition like a revered grandfather: profoundly wise, self-possessed, quiet, comforting." Tao was the first writer to make a poetry of his natural voice and immediate experience, thereby creating the personal lyricism which distinguishes ancient Chinese poetry and makes it seem so contemporary. While maintaining a scholar's attention to the complexities of the original, Hinton here recreates Tao Chien as a compelling poetic voice in English....

Title : The Selected Poems
Author :
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ISBN : 9781556590566
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 96 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Selected Poems Reviews

  • Eddie Watkins
    2019-04-04 05:15

    T’ao Ch’ien is the granddaddy of Chinese dropout poets; dropping out not for political reasons, or as any kind of protest, but rather because he couldn’t tolerate court and office life; preferring poverty and subsistence farming amid the Great Transformation to unsettled ambition and material abundance. Dropping out and moving with his family (wife and two or three kids) to a small house in the 5th century boondocks allowed him direct access to the great Earth’s multitudinous processes of change, an ancient concept dubbed “the Great Transformation”, which coupled with a personal philosophy of letting everything come as it may provided him with - (not happiness exactly) - a nearly transcendent inner freedom. To assist himself in the settled waiting required to tap into these processes, he drank wine, and wrote about drinking wine while drinking wine. He loved his wine! But as the introduction makes clear, he typically drank just enough to “loosen up” and break down habits of mind. Many of his poems were obviously begun with no fixed intention of where they would end up; a characteristic I’ve noticed (and admired) in many old Chinese poets. Spontaneity clearly was key. T’ao Ch’ien will begin a poem in a good mood, become sad and disconsolate, then perk up at the end when he thinks of wine:I couldn’t want another life. This is mytrue calling, working fields and mulberrieswith my own two hands. I’ve never failed it,and still, against hunger and cold, there’sonly hull and chaff. I’m not asking for morethan a full stomach. All I want is enoughcommon rice, heavy clothes for winter andopen-weaves for the summer heat – nothingmore. But I haven’t even managed that. O,it can leave you stricken with grief.And character is fate. If you’re simple-minded in life, its ways elude you. That’show it is. Nothing can change it. But then,I’ll delight in even a single cup of wine.He was also capable of simple light-hearted joy, a low-key euphoria abetted by autumnal sadness:In a meager home, guests rare, I oftenforget I’m surrounded by turning seasons.And now falling leaves fill courtyardemptiness, I grow sad, realizing it’sautumn already. Fresh sunflower thicketsfill north windows. Sweet grains in southfields ripen. Though I’m far from happytoday, I know next year may never come."Get the kids together", I tell my wife,"it’s the perfect day for a nice long walk."There’s quite a bit in these poems that reminds me of the pre-Socratic philosophers – a primitivism coupled with a sophisticated, clear-eyed grasp of tremendous concepts in unadulterated, simplistic form, while making tangible the feel of the planet beneath individualized ancient feet. T’ao Ch’ien is one of the humble immortals.

  • Andrea Lopez
    2019-04-06 03:54

    I believe that Tao Yuanming was a very strong individual, I mean i think at the beginning he did not want to work for the government I saw it more as like a pass down job to him by his relatives it was like he had to do it like if he owed it to someone. As more I read I realized how hard it might have been for him working in a place were he did not want to be I mean the people loved him and had a great respect for him, but it was not something that Tao wanted to do. I felt good when he finally decided to leave the job he was at. When he retired finally after all the thought he put into it after ll the tragic events he went through from the death of his sister for example. having time for him and his family and to be with his children something that he finally wanted to do. The poem that impact me the most or the poem I can say I related was the one returning to live in the farm or something like that I cant remember of the top of my head, any ways I say that I can relate to it because I could read the joy he had to going to a place where he enjoyed. It is like me when I get home and realize I have no homework and on my day off at work I can finally relax. (Who am I kidding I am a college student I will never have time to relax completely) Any way I wish I could just sit down with a glass of wine like Tao Yuanming did and just write my life away. Maybe one day!

  • Kennedy Okafor
    2019-04-05 23:55

    After reading this book I realized that Tao Yuanming was someone who practiced reclusion and he also contributed to the fabric of this tradition. He withdrew from the public sector because of many reasons which I think including that his sister passed away and also that the government was really corrupted and he tried so many times to stay and be that person that would create change for other people and also to the society. Tao was the hope of everyone and when he retired everyone felt really bad because the hope they had in fixing a corrupted government has been gone. Tao was a really good military man that was disgusted by how bad the government was and also I think to him he thought it could not be fixed that’s another reason I think he gave up and retired. Tao also drank lots of wine all the time and I think he was just drinking wine because it helps him relax most of the times. (167)

  • Jefferson
    2019-03-30 06:52

    I don't know about the translation into English, but I loved his words! The last ones about dying and the grave were particularly poignant.