Read The Girl With The Golden Eyes by Honoré de Balzac Online

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By the French author, who, along with Flaubert, is generally regarded as a founding-father of realism in European fiction. His large output of works, collectively entitled The Human Comedy (La Comedie Humaine), consists of 95 finished works (stories, novels and essays) and 48 unfinished works. His stories are an attempt to comprehend and depict the realities of life in conBy the French author, who, along with Flaubert, is generally regarded as a founding-father of realism in European fiction. His large output of works, collectively entitled The Human Comedy (La Comedie Humaine), consists of 95 finished works (stories, novels and essays) and 48 unfinished works. His stories are an attempt to comprehend and depict the realities of life in contemporary bourgeois France. They are placed in a variety of settings, with characters reappearing in multiple stories....

Title : The Girl With The Golden Eyes
Author :
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ISBN : 9781406506457
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 84 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Girl With The Golden Eyes Reviews

  • Fernando
    2019-04-05 03:42

    Placer y oro. En estas dos palabras se apoya Honoré de Balzac para pertrechar esta pequeña novelita sobre el acalorado amor fugaz entre Henri de Marsay y una voluptuosa aunque virginal señorita de pupilas doradas llamada Paquita Valdez.Pero antes de que Balzac nos cuente todo lo referente a este apasionado affaire, nos introducirá durante todo el primer capítulo (la novela consta de tres) en una ciudad de París cien por ciento realista. Atrás quedaron los dorados años del Romanticismo en donde los jóvenes se suicidaban por culpa de las penas que les producían los amores no correspondidos.Ahora la situación es otra. Francia está dominada por la frivolidad, la carrera por trepar en el poder pisando cabezas, lo único que interesa es el status social y los matrimonios por imposición familiar porque así debe ser. Balzac destila ironía, sordidez y un humor muy ácido acerca de la burguesía y el proletariado y para ello define claramente a la todas las clases sociales sin distinción ni remordimientos. Es que de eso se trata el realismo. Las cosas como son. Las utopías, el panteísmo y la divinidad del arte quedan de lado. El hombre es lo que posee. Todo es frío y los sentimientos… bueno, los sentimientos afloran cuando pueden.Ni siquiera la historia entre Henri y Paquita, más allá de ser muy, pero muy apasionada hacia el final del libro alcanza para posicionar al amor en el sitial que ubicaban los románticos. Todos los personajes se basan en intereses creados, algo que se percibe mucho también en Eugénie Grandet. Todo es efímero. Con grandes dosis de pasión desenfrenada, pero fugaz al fin. Luego, la vida vuelve a la normalidad como si nada hubiera pasado. Las últimas líneas de este novela lo comprueban.Hice una relectura de esta novela casi cuatro años después la primera con el aliciente especial de que está traducida por Cristina Piña, quien fuera mi profesora de Introducción a la Literatura y Teoría y Crítica Literarias, en la época que fui estudiante de Licenciatura en Letras con lo cual el sigo atesorando un placer inmenso cada vez que recuerdo esa maravillosa época de oro como estudiante de letras.

  • Henry Martin
    2019-04-24 06:48

    The Girl with the Golden Eyes...such an unassuming title. If one considers Balzac to be one of the classical writers, than one would reach for this book thinking it would go along the lines of other classic novellas. Hmmm...the title sounds almost romantic. The Girl with the Golden Eyes is an interesting piece of literature. Despite its short length, it could be divided into three separate books: First, the reader is introduced to the scene - Parisian life - in no flattering terms. "In Paris, there are only two ages, youth and decay: a bloodless, pallid youth and a decay painted to seem youthful." or "Everything is tolerated: the government and the guillotine, religion and cholera. You are always welcome in this world, and you are never missed." Here Balzac splits the Parisians into three main classes. "The class that has nothing: The worker, the proletarian, the man who lives by his feet, his hands, his tongue, his back, his good arm, his five fingers."Balzac blatantly exposes this class with severe judgement, observing the never-ending labor whose fruits are blown away at the end of the week: "Then they take their pleasure and relaxation in an exhausting debauch, which leaves their skin brown with filth, black and blue with violence, blotched with drunkenness, or yellow with indigestion. This lasts only two days but steals tomorrow's bread, the weekly soup, the wife's new dress, and swaddling for the ragged child." Then there are the workers who see future, save money, and start a small shop - the "...king of Parisian scene who has submitted to time and space. Yes, hats off to this creature made of saltpeter and gas, who gives children to France during his industrious nights and during the day runs here and there in the service, glory, and pleasure of his fellow citizens. This man resolves the problem of satisfying simultaneously an agreeable wife, his household, the Constitutionel, his office, the National Guard, the Opera, and God, all for the purpose of transforming the Constitutionel, the office, the Opera, the National Guard, the wife, and God into gold." The second Parisian scene, "...the world of those who possess something." ... "Wholesalers and their boys, civil servants, small bankers of great honesty, rogues and rascals, head clerks and errand boys, the bailiff's bookkeeper, the lawyer, the notary, indeed the seething, scheming, speculating members of that lower middle class that caters to the demands of Paris and stays on alert, hoarding provisions, handling products manufactured by the proletariat, dealing in fruit from the Midi, fish from the sea, wines from every sun-kissed slope. This class reaches out its hands to the Orient, takes shawls the Turks and Russians discard, casts its net as far as the Indies, waits for sales and looks for bargains, discounts bills of exchange and rolls along, gathering everything of value. It wraps up Paris bit by bit and carts it off, on the alert for the fantasies of childhood, spying out the whims and vices of maturity, and extorting advantage from its disease." The third class, "...a kind of Parisian belly in which the interests of the city are digested and condensed into forms known as affairs, the crowd of layers, doctors, notaries, barristers, business men, and magistrates are stirred and shaken by and acidic and bitter intestinal movement." ... "In the end, of necessity they become cynical about all feeling, forced as they are by laws, men, and institutions to hover like vultures over still-warm corpses."Above this third class lies the realm of the artist. "An artist's face is always extraordinary; it is always above or below the conventional lines of what fools call ideal beauty. What force destroys them? Passion. In Paris every passion is resolved into two terms: gold or pleasure."And lastly, above the artist is the realm of the aristocrat, where this story takes place. "Don't look for affections here, any more than for ideas. Embraces conceal a profound indifference, and politeness an unrelieved contempt. No one here is capable of loving his fellow man." ... "This empty life, this constant anticipation of unfulfilled pleasure, this permanent boredom, this frivolity of mind, heart, and brain, this weariness with the great Parisian reception is mirrored in their features and produces those cardboard faces, those premature wrinkles, that physiognomy of the rich in which impotence grins, gold is reflected, and intelligence has fled."Thus, after reading twenty-six pages of politically charged social commentary on Balzac's day Paris, the story finally begins. It begins here, switching gears and style from the preceding pages into the realm of romance (and satire). The prose shifts towards poetic (and over the top), and we are introduced to Henri de Marsay, "...the handsomest young man in Paris. From his father, Lord Dudley, he had inherited the most amorously enchanting blue eyes; from his mother, thick curly black hair; from both parents pure blood, a girlish complexion, a gentle and modest manner, a slim and aristocratic figure, and beautiful hands." However, his "... fine qualities and charming defects were tarnished by one dreadful vice: He believed in neither mean nor women, God nor the Devil. Capricious nature had given him gifts; a priest had finished the task." There is also a seemingly out-of place mention that Lord Dudley had several children, one of who is Euphemie, the daughter to a Spanish lady. She was raised in Havana, then taken to Madrid with a Creole man. She was married to an old and immensely rich Spanish Lord, Don Hijos, Marguis de San-Real who has come to live in Paris. Henri de Marsay is a playboy who likes to play. He has the looks and the means to enjoy life to its fullest. But, strolling on a promenade one fine afternoon, Henri meets the "girl with the golden eyes", a mysterious, protected creature who is the talk of all the young Parisian men. This girl turns out to be Paquita Valdez.De Marsay uses his advantages and influence to find out where Paquita lives, bribes a postman, and has a letter delivered to her. Once Paquita accepts his advances, she drugs her female guardian, and de Marsay sneaks into the house. Eventually they end up in a love nest built specifically for pleasure. The decor is rich and lavish, the walls are soundproof. Here, in a moment of passion, we learn that Paquita is a virgin yet very well versed in the ways of love. Henri begins to suspect something. Unfortunately, throughout this part of the novel, the language turns more towards the romantic, even cheesy at times with overly flowery descriptions and unrealistic comparisons. Still, I kept reading on. Once Henri 'conquers' Paquita, he is torn between the pleasures she offers, and a new potential 'target' a woman hundred times more beautiful that all the young men talk about. This woman turns out to be the Marquise, the wife of Don Hijos. One night, when Henri fornicates with Paquita in the love nest, Paquita keeps begging him to kill her because she could never escape her prison. It turns out Paquita is the daughter of a Georgian slave to Don Hijos, and that her mother also sold her. Paquita, while making love to Henri (whom she made dress up in woman's clothing), cries out a woman's name. Henri gets upset and ready to strangle her, but a huge Creole man, Christemio who guards Paquita stops him. De Marsay shoots Paquita a look that says, "You will die" before departing from the house. And here the novel yet again changes style and language, shifting towards the unexpected.(view spoiler)[A few days later, Henri and his friends set out to kill Paquita. This is not stated, but rather implied. When they arrive at the house, they realize that someone else is already there, since cries of pain are escaping the soundproof love nest through the chimney. He climbs up into the room only to find Paguita lying in a pool of blood. Her Georgian mother is there, Christemio is dead, and the beautiful Marquise is standing there with a dagger in her hands. She had killed Paquita, her lover, out of passion. When she realizes Henri is in the room, she swings around and they look each other in the eyes, immediately realizing that they are related, both the children of Lord Dudley. The Marquise and Henri seems unconcerned with the crime as much as devastated by the loss of a lover. The Marquise pays off Paquita's mother, who happily accepts gold and does not complain, Then the Marquise informs Henri that she will return to Spain and enter a convent. They part with the words: "Nothing can console us for losing our idea of the infinite."Eight days later, when his friends question de Marsay about the girl with the golden eyes, he simply answers that: "She died.""Of what?""A chest complaint." (hide spoiler)]I generally don't disclose endings, but this novella was rather unexpected, so I make an exception. If I were to pick up this book in the middle and start reading, I would have stopped assuming it is all but romantic mumbo-jumbo. However, this could not be farther from the truth. It's a very short read that is worth the time, especially if you enjoy the unforeseen. Balzac is great at crimes of passion, at forbidden fruit and consequences, and this one is no exception.

  • Tempo de Ler
    2019-04-16 08:41

    «A vida é uma singular comédia.» (p. 72)São escritores como Balzac que elevam a prosa ao estatuto de arte e tornam o simples ato de ler num enorme prazer. Foi então pela escrita do autor que me rendi a «A Rapariga dos Olhos de Ouro», mais do que propriamente pelo melodramático romance. Gostei muito do cuidado analítico e do tom crítico com que Balzac nos fala da sociedade parisiense do século XIX (Capítulo I: «Fisionomias Parisienses»), ridicularizando-a e despindo-a de mérito uma vez após a outra. Uma sociedade que acaba por não estar assim tão longe da nossa, como gostaríamos de nos gabar que está. Este Parisiense vive avidamente, obcecado com as aparências, buscando tudo com ferocidade sem se deixar conquistar realmente pelo que quer que seja. Para ele o dinheiro é sinónimo de poder e há que obtê-lo a qualquer custo, tornando-o o preliminar, mas também o próprio intuito, da corrupção. Aqui, ouro e prazer são o senhor universal; e o desejo por um, ou por ambos, acaba por entorpecer os sentidos.«Todos estão identicamente cariados até aos ossos por cálculo, por depravação, por um brutal desejo de vencer, e, sondando-os bem, encontraríamos em todos uma pedra no coração.» (p. 31)Cheio de pontos que merecem uma pausa para reflexão, este livro acabou por me surpreender pela inclusão de tópicos tabu que não esperava encontrar, tais como escravidão sexual e lesbianismo. A precipitação com que me chegou o final - também ele com resoluções que não esperava - acabou por me deixar em ligeiro choque, pairando sobre os últimos parágrafos alguns minutos depois de já terminada a leitura.Com parágrafos grandes e escrita muito trabalhada, o tamanho do livro e o ritmo que adquire no final impediram que a leitura se tornasse aborrecida. Gostei muito e fiquei muito satisfeita com a tradução (Domingos Monteiro - Relógio D'Água) que por vezes tanto prazer no rouba às leituras.

  • Baran باران
    2019-04-06 10:52

    Cemil Meriç'in mükemmel çevirisiyle ilginç bir Balzac romanı. Sarrasine romanından cinsel meselelere karşı duyarlılığını bildiğimiz Balzac bu romanda kitabın ancak sonlarında orda bir iki sayfa içerisinde üstü kapalı olarak anlayabildiğimiz iki kadın arasında yaşanan bir aşkın hazin sonunu hikaye eder. Okunmaya değer bir çalışma, ancak kitabın en güzel yanlarından biri 184 sayfalık kitabın 93 sayfalık Cemil Meriç'in Balzac'ın hayatına ve eserlerine dair -kırpılmış olmasına rağmen- geniş değerlendirmesi.. Tüm Balzac severler için keyifli bir eser olacağını düşünüyorum. Paris'in sosyal yaşa mını kurcaladığı uzun sayfalarda biraz sıkkınlık gelse de, okumaya devam edince romandan alınan keyif katlanarak arttı.

  • Chris
    2019-03-24 10:30

    Blah. First off, this begins with 30 pages which describe all of the ways Paris is terrible. As far as that goes, it has very little to do with the story. Henri is such a ridiculously one-dimensional and aggravating character. Actually, maybe not one dimensional, as he changes his character's way of being without rhyme or reason several times during the novel. His way of thinking is completely irrational, and the "love" and "passion" that he feel is more grotesque than anything else. If this is what Balzac was going for, than he got it.The whole story is a little lacking in depth. Oh, these two random people see each other twice and decide to risk both of their lives in order to have a brief tryst that is completely meaningless to at least one of them. Then, the golden-eyed girl gets killed by her master. How that master knew what had happened withHenri, there is no telling.And then this ridiculous ending. Not very entertaining or interesting, though it does have a couple of well written sentences, for which I gave it one star more.

  • Marts(Thinker)
    2019-04-08 06:27

    After a long description of Paris and then the introduction of Henri de Marsay, in comes a 'golden-eyed' girl who is eventually killed by her jealous mistress...

  • Tejas Desai
    2019-04-20 08:45

    I taught this novella in my writer's workshop and most of my students could not get through it, but that's a shame. While it is certainly is not perfect, it is one of the more interesting novellas I've read, and one of Balzac's many fascinating works. The structure itself is a marvel, as it begins with an overview of all of Parisian (and human) society and zeroes in on one very specific, and very grim, tale. This is where Balzac began his oeuvre, folks, this is where one of the greatest, if not the greatest, literary achievements of all time was born. A portrait and reflection of an entire society began in the first pages of this novella.Melville House Books Edition recommended.

  • Dagny
    2019-04-14 07:31

    This story is one of The Thirteen, a trilogy about a mysterious band of men pledged to assist each other at need with no questions asked. We learn some past history and probably more than we wanted to know about Henri de Marsay who appears in sixteen of the Comedie humaine stories.

  • Rafa Sánchez
    2019-04-07 06:46

    Balzac siempre colma tus aspiraciones de disfrutar de una buena narración por su maestría pero en esta novelita parece que tuvo prisa por acabarla y deja muchos cabos sueltos.

  • Becky
    2019-04-21 05:45

    When I find a person, a book, or an author that I find really interesting, I like to investigate to see what THEY found interesting. That is how I eventually came to Balzac. I had just finished reading Sin in the Second City (a fantastic history of a high class brothel in the early days of Chicago), and it mentioned that the Mistresses of the Everleigh club schooled the prostitutes and many lessons focused on Balzac. I thought that I should look into Balzac myself. His prose is breathtaking. This isn’t even recognized as one of his best works. The series is mind-bogglingly huge, and I just randomly picked this one out because it was on Librivox and I didn’t feel like going to the library to borrow a paperback. I was floored. Every word was perfect, profound, heart rending and true. Oh so so true. Perhaps this sounds ridiculous, but the story was lyrical, and symphony of sights and sounds that just stab at you with a sort of sweet pain. I read something about him that stated he never stopped revising editions, to the great dismay of his editors. I think it such a shame that I don’t speak or read French, because this work was so beautiful in English, that I cannot imagine its perfection in its original language. It reminds me of the Mark Twain quote “The difference between the almost right word & the right word is really a large matter--it's the difference between the lightning bug and the lightning.” I fully intend on reading the complete works of Honore de Balzac, and any aspiring writer or lover of the art of literature should invest some time in him. Scintillating is a good word to describe this actual story. It’s full of lust, jealousy, deceit, really powerful chaotic emotion. It’s wonderful. Who needs Desperate Housewives? I’ve got BALZAC!

  • Elizabeth Ferrer Sanabria
    2019-03-27 06:55

    Es la segunda obra que leo de Balzac y casi no la termino, porque hasta la mitad del libro encuentras el argumento.-"¿Sabes, Paul, que llevo una vida embrutecida? Va siendo hora de buscar un destino, de emplear las fuerzas en algo que merezca la pena vivir. La vida es una comedia singular. Estoy asustado; me rio de la inconsecuencia de nuestro orden social. El gobierno les corta la cabeza a unos pobres infelices que ha matado a un hombre y da patente a unos seres que liquidan cada invierno (...) La ética está inerme contra una docena de vicios que destruyen la sociedad y que nada pueda castigar (...) Palabra de honor de que el hombre es un bufón que baila a la orilla de un precipicio. Nos hablan de la inmoralidad, de las relaciones peligrosas y de no sé qué otro libro tiene nombre de doncella de servicio; pero existe un libro horrible, sucio, espantoso, corruptor, siempre abierto, que nunca cerrará nadie, el gran libro del mundo (...) que se compone de todo lo que se dice al oído entre hombres o tras el abanico entre mujeres, por la noche, en el baile".- "No hay más devoción que la devoción que obedece a la amistad sin juzgarla. Tienes en ese hombre a un amigo verdadero".

  • Bruan
    2019-04-04 03:25

    Refreshingly cynical in his effortless slicing of society's absurdities, over 150 years later, Balzac's keen and scathing observations continue to apply to modern western civilization:"Now we have reached the third circle of this hell… Their actual stupidity is hidden beneath an expert science. They know their profession, but they ignore anything unconnected with their profession. So, to protect their self-esteem, they call everything into question, criticize right and left; seem skeptical but are actually gullible, and drown their minds in interminable discussions. Almost all of them adopt convenient social, literary, or political prejudices so as to dispense with having to form an opinion of their own… Having left home early in order to become remarkable men, they become mediocre, and crawl along on the heights of society."The second part features Balzac's descriptions of surging passions, which are timeless and sublime:"She squeezed him tight, brought her head up to his, offered her lips, and gave him a kiss that gave them both such vertigo that de Marsay thought the earth was opening up… The scene was like a dream for de Marsay, but one of those dreams that, even as they evaporate, leave behind a feeling of supernatural voluptuousness in the soul, which a man chases after for the rest of his life.”

  • Ana Rînceanu
    2019-04-11 10:27

    Question: Did Balzac hate people in general or just people in Paris?Answer: .......I've got mixed feelings about this book. Perhaps, this novella is meant to be read if you're in the mood to ridicule people, their pettiness and superficiality. I can't really shake the feeling that Balzac wrote this to entice the reader with artful and often grotesque descriptions and deprave characters which only inspire a sense of sensationalism. Although he describes love so ardently and brings a sharp critique to Parisian morality, I find myself irritated with how he views homosexuality and female empowerment.P.S: If anyone knows the answer to the question stated above, please don't be shy and let me know (in case I'm oversimplifying everything).

  • Marie Viala
    2019-04-21 05:51

    On ne peut pas vraiment parler de déception, puisque je j'attendais rien de ce livre. C'est la curiosité qui m'avait poussée à le lire : diantre, Balzac a écrit a propos de relations sapphiques ? Il faut que je vérifie ça de mes propres yeux... Mon incrédulité a été, hélas, justifiée, puisque le scénario était, très honnêtement, loin de celui des autres Balzac auxquels j'ai pu jeter un œil, et que j'ai trouvé bien plus intéressante et approfondie la relation entre de Marsay et son pote dandy que celle qui était censée retenir mon attention. Allez, sans rancune Honoré, je te mets quand même 1,5/5 parce que je rigole toujours tellement sur tes descriptions sombres, acerbes et pessimistes du monde en général et des parisiens en particulier.

  • Alaina
    2019-04-23 07:25

    Dear Balzac, there is no man knows crimes of passion like you! The vice of passion is one of Balzac's favorite themes, and he writes on it brilliantly in this book. In this work, the vice in question is Lesbianism, for which Pacquita pays fittingly by dying at the hands of her jealous Mistress. Of course no other end would be allowed, Lesbianism was an unthinkable perversion in 19th c. France. Hence, Balzac's choice of the theme. He wanted to shock readers "out of their moral complacency." (Faderman, 266)For a more in depth analysis of this aspect of the work, see Surpassing the Love of Men, by Lillian Faderman.

  • Elena Druță
    2019-04-14 07:28

    Maestru în portretizarea firii umane, Balzac oferă cititorului o povestire inedită, încadrată într-o epocă și într-o societate murdară, dar atât de atrăgătoare pentru tinerii ce sunt atât de ușor de corupt; soarta lui Henri de Marsay, cât și situația în care se regăsește domnișoara Paquita nu sunt niște excepții; sunt reprezentări ai decăderii, atât de accesibilă unor firi slabe, crescute în lumina banilor și în umbra familiilor. Povestea celor doi îndrăgostiți nu oglindește doar o întâmplare, ci și un portret complex al Parisului, ai cărui străduțe duc doar spre pierzanie...

  • Gerald
    2019-04-16 06:50

    Balzac begins this story with a vicious rant against humankind. It was almost enough to make me stop but I confess I skimmed it to get to the good part, which is fairly steamy for the time.There is a plot twist and a surprising one. He foreshadows it a bit but you still won't see it coming. Then when it's upon you, you might miss it. I did. The Marquis makes a one-eighty and turns on his lover.I had to go to Wikipedia and read a plot summary to figure out why!The women are both victims and monsters in this one. And the main character, the dashing Marquis, has no scruples whatever.

  • Mallika Soni
    2019-04-24 10:48

    Ok. It took me a while to understand what happened with me when the book ended. The beginning as everyone has said is tiring .. Paris!! This man has some problem with Paris for sure. Then the story begins and it begins beautifully after 30 pages of Paris though. It is an extremely advanced read and must be called a Classic Novella. The end is baffling and surprising. So.yeah. I recommend it and only to those who have patience to deal with tough vocabulary and a lot of confusion.

  • Lisa
    2019-04-11 10:33

    As with the other stories I have read from La Comedie Humaine, this is not a review, it's a summary so that I can remember what I've read from this complex collection of short stories and novellas. So BEWARE: IT'S ALL SPOILERSIt's at http://balzacbooks.wordpress.com/2014...

  • Debby Nemecek
    2019-04-17 11:27

    I just didn't "get it." A short book, but at points I could not follow the story and at points I found it innane & insane. Some points I did enjoy the detailed descriptions of the various characters that make up Paris or the detail of a room. But at the end, my thoguh was just - Huh?

  • Maria
    2019-04-16 08:32

    Slim novella (part of the Human Comedy series) -- jaded boy meets lovely girl in thrall to another. Excellent prologue and first chapter, then some good melodrama.

  • Gláucia Renata
    2019-04-06 05:29

    Novela publicada em 1835, compõe a trilogia História dos Treze, juntamente com Ferragus e A Duquesa de Langeais. As histórias são independentes mas tem em comum o Clube dos Devoradores, sociedade secreta onde os 13 membros se comprometem a se ajudar mutuamente haja o que houver (ou haja o que hajar como dizia o saudoso Vicente Matheus).O protagonista é Henri de Marsay, playboyzinho que aparece em outros livros do autor e aqui se encanta com uma menina misteriosa (a tal dos olhos de ouro), Paquita Valdés. A garota é desejada por todos mas vive praticamente trancada e vigiada 24 horas do dia por pessoas que mais parecem cães de guarda. De Marsay, como um autêntico Don Juan balzaquiano jura não descansar enquanto não seduzi-la e recorre ao clube dos 13 do qual faz parte.Vi muita gente reclamar que houve spoiler na sinopse (E A PARTIR DAQUI PODE HAVER SPOILER) que diz que o livro aborda a paixão entre duas mulheres mas isso pra mim foi mais que necessário. A relação homossexual entre Paquita e Margarita-Euphémia Porrabéril (Balzac caprichou na escolha dos nomes né?) é tão sutil que eu não teria percebido nada se não fosse essa nota na sinopse e no prefácio.História legalzinha e diz a lenda que baseada em alguns fatos reais. Mas tem aquele tipo de final pra lá de exagerado e dramático a la Balzac. Valeu pelo tema abordado. Honoré a frente de seu tempo. Em O Pai Goriot temos um personagem homossexual de forma um pouco mais ostensiva. Histórico de leitura26/05/201779% (101 de 128)"O homem se protege assim: usa a mulher para que a mulher não possa usá-lo." 60% (77 de 128)"A mulher estava bastante mal vestida, penteada com um desses turbantes que inventam as inglesas quando chegam a uma certa idade e que teriam um sucesso infinito na China, onde o belo ideal dos artistas é a monstruosidade."15% (19 de 128)"Um dos espetáculos que reúne o que há de mais assustador é certamente o aspecto geral da população parisiense, povo horrível de se ver, macilento, amarelo, com a pele curtida."

  • Juan Rivera
    2019-04-23 03:42

    When a beautiful girl time many times you imagine things that are not. You want to see her as very intelligent, very brave, very open, etc ... all the qualities you want to find in a woman.Almost always, when you know it, it is totally the opposite.You always learn something of life when you read renowned authors, and Honoré de Balsak's "The girl with the golden eyes" has everything, even an unexpected end.Honoré wrote countless books about the life in France of his time. A reference to who wants to know that France of yesteryear, romantic and alive, told by the teacher.In this book the girl object of love was not only uneducated but even a slave sold for the pleasure of its owner ... Read it, it is short and you will like it.

  • Kübra Merve
    2019-04-24 06:40

    İlk olarak Cemil Meriç çevirisi okuduğum için pişmanım. Günümüz Türkçesinde kullanmadığımız kelimeler çok fazla olduğu için sürekli kitaptan kopma durumu söz konusu. Kitabın okunması gereken kısmı anladığım kadarıyla ilk 20 sayfası olmasına rağmen çevirininde etkisiyle tasvirlerin ağırlığı bu asıl kısmı okunamaz hale getiriyor. Hikayenin konusu oldukça mide bulandırıcı. Sonuç olarak okuması zor ve zevksiz bir kitap.

  • Imelda
    2019-04-05 09:34

    Inesperada. Entretenida, interesante, original. Una historia muy buena, personajes fascinantes, y la historia aun más fascinante.Excelente.

  • antonio brito
    2019-04-08 05:54

    Descrevendo a sociedade parisiense Balzac define seu objetivo - "Deste modo, chegamos ao terceiro ciclo desse inferno, que possivelmente, terá um dia o seu Dante" - Evidente que este Dante é o próprio Balzac. A comédia humana dos parisienses aqui descrita é o mundo dos vivos do Inferno da Divina Comédia de Dante. Não procure nesta novela um roteiro romântico, ficarás frustado. No primeiro capítulo a sociedade parisiense é classificada em círculos sociais que podem muito bem representar nossa sociedade. Nele encontramos o Balzac que se aprofunda na análise das diversas camadas sociais, com suas angústias e ilusões, vidas tragadas no vinho barato dos operários ou nas ilusões dos ricos. Mesmo o leitor mais atento encontrará dificuldade em identificar um relacionamento lésbico, como sugere a capa, entre a menina dos olhos de ouro e sua proprietária. Nos dois últimos capítulos percebe-se o esforço de Balzac em costurar com a linha da criatividade partes de cenários e personagens românticos inverossímeis, mesmo para o mais imaginativo leitor. A Professora Heineberg é uma das melhores tradutoras de Balzac. Faz um grande favor ao leitor quando deixa no Francês original os nomes próprios, ao contrário das demais traduções. A editora presta um relevante serviço ao tornar acessível uma obra como esta. Provavelmente é possível aprender sociologia desconhecendo as Cenas da Vida Parisiense, em particular o primeiro capítulo de A menina dos olhos de ouro, porém não deixará de ser uma perda.

  • Richard Smith
    2019-04-21 03:41

    The only way to read this delicious novella is to abandon yourself to it. Take is seriously and you'll never finish.My blog: https://richardswsmith.wordpress.com/...

  • antonio brito
    2019-03-28 10:25

    Descrevendo a sociedade parisiense Balzac define seu objetivo - "Deste modo, chegamos ao terceiro ciclo desse inferno, que possivelmente, terá um dia o seu Dante" - Evidente que este Dante é o próprio Balzac. A comédia humana dos parisienses aqui descrita é o mundo dos vivos do Inferno da Divina Comédia de Dante. Não procure nesta novela um roteiro romântico, ficarás frustado. No primeiro capítulo a sociedade parisiense é classificada em círculos sociais que podem muito bem representar nossa sociedade. Nele encontramos o Balzac que se aprofunda na análise das diversas camadas sociais, com suas angústias e ilusões, vidas tragadas no vinho barato dos operários ou nas ilusões dos ricos. Mesmo o leitor mais atento encontrará dificuldade em identificar um relacionamento lésbico, como sugere a capa, entre a menina dos olhos de ouro e sua proprietária. Nos dois últimos capítulos percebe-se o esforço de Balzac em costurar com a linha da criatividade partes de cenários e personagens românticos inverossímeis, mesmo para o mais imaginativo leitor. A Professora Heineberg é uma das melhores tradutoras de Balzac. Faz um grande favor ao leitor quando deixa no Francês original os nomes próprios, ao contrário das demais traduções. A editora presta um relevante serviço ao tornar acessível uma obra como esta. Provavelmente é possível aprender sociologia desconhecendo as Cenas da Vida Parisiense, em particular o primeiro capítulo de A menina dos olhos de ouro, porém não deixará de ser uma perda.

  • Amandine
    2019-04-18 03:31

    Après ma lecture des Diaboliques de Barbey d'Aurevilly, j'ai eu envie de rester parmi les classiques et de choisir une valeur stylistique sure. Cette nouvelle de Balzac, dont le résumé annonçait une histoire d'amour impossible, correspondait tout à fait à cette envie. En termes d'amour impossible et mortelle, j'ai été parfaitement servie, mais n'ai à vrai dire pas compris comment : Balzac semble lancer plusieurs fausses pistes potentielles pour expliquer l'impossibilité d'amour pour le couple central, mais aucune n'aboutit véritablement, et la mort finale m'échappe. Heureusement, cette intrigue bancale a été compensée pour moi par la peinture des personnages : la fille aux yeux d'or a bien sûr été parée de tous les attributs mystérieux propres à susciter la fascination ; quant au héros masculin de ce drame, il correspond parfaitement au type du libertin du 18e siècle, dans ses moindres détails. Par ce caractère, il correspond également tout à fait à l'état d'esprit parisien décrit par Balzac en ouverture de son texte.Cette nouvelle ne compte sans doute pas parmi les meilleurs textes de Balzac, mais fut l'occasion d'un moment de lecture plaisant.

  • Sylvester
    2019-03-27 06:29

    I gave this two stars because I just can't give Balzac only one. But if you're thinking of reading his books, skip this one, he's got so many that are amazing, and this one falls short of his usual standard. It was good at the beginning, and got me nicely warmed up, and then went strangely awry - sort of Gothic/Arabian Nights with a lot of confusion thrown in - not what I'd ever expect from Balzac. The beginning had a few great comments as given from the point of view of a man who is so handsome and sought-after by women that he is "satiated with love", and can no longer feel interest in love unless it is withheld from him - the comment (my paraphrase) is something to the effect of how a man loved by many women seems to be a man of substance - he leaves it at that, intimating that he knows very well that he has none. Loved that. Balzac has very keen insight into character, and a detailed way with description.